Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Indoor Tortoise

type indoor tortoise

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Donatello

Donatello

    Tortoise Forum Newby

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 April 2013 - 09:40 AM

Hi

 

My wife and I are currently looking at getting our first tortoise. We have previously looked at a juvenile Hermann, however, looking in more detail suggests that for the majority of the year they prefer an outside environment as opposed to an indoor one.

 

Are there any turtles which prefer/or are more comofrtable with an indoor environment all year round? Would a non-hibernating tortoise (such as a Leopard or a Redfoot) be more accomodating to staying indoors?

 

Also, are there any breeds which are recommended for 'beginners' at all?

 

Many thanks

 

Jon



#2 Sundayboy

Sundayboy

    Tortoise Forum Newby

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southampton
  • Interests:I am a proud owner of two hermann tortoises, Archie aged 6 and Dolly aged 3. I also have a bearded dragon which we rescued called Spike and a cockatiel we called Bubbles, who we affectionately refer to as Bubba Boy..

Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:10 AM

Hi Jon 

 

:welcomechalk: to the forum. I am new here myself and don't have the answers you are looking for, but everyone here is really helpful and will give you good honest and sound advice.



#3 mildredsmam

mildredsmam

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • Administrator
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,821 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:north east

Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:36 AM

hi jon welcome to the forum. :welcome:

all tortoises benefit from been outside in natural sunlight.

I don't know a great deal about redfoots as I don't keep them, their care is different from a Hermann tortoise I know they require higher humidity and think you would need to do more research into their care, hopefully Jayne will be on soon she will be able to help more with this.

as for a leopard tortoise you would need a lot of outside space for one of these as they grow very large, people who keep these house them outside in a heated shed or some thing along those lines, as they don't hibernate you would have to provide a heated area through winter.

leopards are also tortoises that graze and would need an area to do this, theres a lot to think about with larger tortoises before you decide. :)

most people think horsfields or hermanns are a better choice for a first tortoise but these tortoises do better with time outside.

hope that helps a bit, any questions you have just ask theres always someone around to help. :)



#4 Guest_Stella_*

Guest_Stella_*
  • Guests

Posted 07 April 2013 - 03:33 PM

Welcome to the forum Jon and Jon's Wife... I would agree with all that has been said, though my knowledge is purely with Hermanns boegetti which I know a lot of people keep indoors all year round and do not hibernate. This I suggest is a matter of personal preference, but as others have said most torts benefit from being outside for at least part of the year. Also, Hermanns do grow to be quite large and heavy as they reach adulthood and would require thought to housing outdoors eventually x x

#5 Donatello

Donatello

    Tortoise Forum Newby

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 April 2013 - 06:41 PM

Thanks for everybody's responses.

 

To give a bit of background to us, we currently live in a 2 bed apartment, although will look to move as our family starts/gets bigger so do not currently have a safe garden area for any tortoise to be kept.

 

Following up on points raised, a couple of posts mentioned that a number of people do keep Hermanns indoors all year round, which obviously may lead to a deficiency in Vitamin D. What are the potential effects of this?

 

Secondly, most information we are reading suggests hibernation period of up to 20 weeks, although I note not for ill or underweight torts. Again, what are the potential impacts of not hibernating a Hermann or similar?

 

Lastly, we want to provide the best possible care for any tort and would not want to venture into this if we are not suitable. In your honest opinions, do you think it inhumane to keep a tort indoor all year round/not hibernate?



#6 jay

jay

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 389 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:walsall

Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:17 PM

Hello Jon

redfoot torts come from South America where temperature ranges are fairly constant all year round,they thrive in warm and humid enviroment,they are a non hibernating tortoise,adult males are larger than the females they are medium sized torts so they grow quite large around 9kg or more,my redfoot has a superb character very friendly,they are omnivorous,loves pinkies and meal worms,housing needs to kept with high humidity so you have to keep humidity levels up with spraying water,he can only go outside in the summer months ,make sure you have enough space for a redfoot before having as you have to think of all year round,i rehomed my redfoot and he's now a big part of our family.

Jaynex



#7 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:55 PM

Thanks for everybody's responses.
 
To give a bit of background to us, we currently live in a 2 bed apartment, although will look to move as our family starts/gets bigger so do not currently have a safe garden area for any tortoise to be kept.
 
Following up on points raised, a couple of posts mentioned that a number of people do keep Hermanns indoors all year round, which obviously may lead to a deficiency in Vitamin D. What are the potential effects of this?
 
Secondly, most information we are reading suggests hibernation period of up to 20 weeks, although I note not for ill or underweight torts. Again, what are the potential impacts of not hibernating a Hermann or similar?


Lastly, we want to provide the best possible care for any tort and would not want to venture into this if we are not suitable. In your honest opinions, do you think it inhumane to keep a tort indoor all year round/not hibernate?

Hi Jon
Some of the things you say make perfect sense to me and seem to show that you already have a good insight and sensibility into the care of Hermanns'.
With regard to hibernation, please take a look at our hibernation section were you will find some helpful guides and useful comments about the whole issue of hibernation. My own personal belief is that 2-3 years old is time enough to hibernate this species. Others may differ.
Although, in the short term, an indoor enclosure may be adequate to keep younger and smaller Hermanns', eventually as they grow older and get bigger they will need more space and an outdoor enclosure.
Anyway Jon, I'm not trying to put you off but I feel you will need to make a decision based on your own particular circumstances and in the interests of any particular tortoise you may want to keep.
Hopefully there will be others along shortly who can offer you more helpful advice. For now I wish you the best of luck.
Take care. Talk soon.
Kind Regards
Freddy

#8 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 08 April 2013 - 02:51 PM

I hibernate mine from the first year Freddy. I've always done this and they grow so beautifully. The shell growth pattern is formed pretty much in the early years and hibernating helps this no end. Feeding year round for the first two to three years 'usually' sets the start of pyramiding, especially when kept very dry.

At the moment due to all the snow we have had, mine are indoors with full spectrum lighting and optimum heat but they are not happy and won't show their true colours until they get outside, I know ;)

 

 

Hi Jon
Some of the things you say make perfect sense to me and seem to show that you already have a good insight and sensibility into the care of Hermanns'.
With regard to hibernation, please take a look at our hibernation section were you will find some helpful guides and useful comments about the whole issue of hibernation. My own personal belief is that 2-3 years old is time enough to hibernate this species. Others may differ.
Although, in the short term, an indoor enclosure may be adequate to keep younger and smaller Hermanns', eventually as they grow older and get bigger they will need more space and an outdoor enclosure.
Anyway Jon, I'm not trying to put you off but I feel you will need to make a decision based on your own particular circumstances and in the interests of any particular tortoise you may want to keep.
Hopefully there will be others along shortly who can offer you more helpful advice. For now I wish you the best of luck.
Take care. Talk soon.
Kind Regards
Freddy



#9 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 16 April 2013 - 08:13 PM

Hi again Jon,
Although there are few facts about whether NOT hibernating a Hermanns' is harmful there is a wealth of experience which shows that hibernation is in fact beneficial. I have a 50+ year old female Hermanns' that I have been hibernating successfully for the past 30 years. She has never had any health problems and has exceeded her average life expectancy by approx 20 years. I put her constant good health and great longevity down to the fact that she has always been hibernated. As they say the proof is in the pudding. Here is a link about the benefits of hibernation which you may find useful:http://www.hermann-t...?showtopic=8059
Best of luck
Freddy

#10 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 April 2013 - 07:42 AM

Hi Freddy

Not being pedantic here but your tortoise is just middle aged. Hermanns live to around 100 years old and I have an egg laying female estimated to be around that age and a couple more, well into their sixties. They hibernate the full winter cold period and are in perfect health ;)



#11 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:40 AM

Hi Sue,
I know Hermanns' in captivity can live until much older but I recently read that in the wild their average life expectancy is 35 years.
If I'm wrong I stand corrected.
Kind Regards
Freddy

#12 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 April 2013 - 01:12 PM

That is due to road accidents, predators etc Freddy - the life expectancy in the wild is the same as in good conditions in captivity, as this is where conditions are optimum ;) I would go so far as to say, without predators etc they would likely live longer in the wild - look at Lonesome George :(

Hi Sue,
I know Hermanns' in captivity can live until much older but I recently read that in the wild their average life expectancy is 35 years.
If I'm wrong I stand corrected.
Kind Regards
Freddy



#13 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 17 April 2013 - 01:29 PM

Thanks for the clarification, Sue. I can now see why that is. I guess I should really read into things a little more.
Take care.
Freddy

#14 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 April 2013 - 05:35 PM

So your Billiejo could still be a Mummy tortoise one day ;)



#15 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:15 PM

Hi Sue,
I don't know how true it is but I was advised against breeding her at this stage of her life because of the risk of the eggs binding inside her. She has never been bred before. I would be interested to hear your thoughts.
Best wishes
Freddy

#16 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 April 2013 - 11:19 PM

Hi Sue,
I don't know how true it is but I was advised against breeding her at this stage of her life because of the risk of the eggs binding inside her. She has never been bred before. I would be interested to hear your thoughts.
Best wishes
Freddy

She's not old at all if in her fifties Freddy. When I got Tilly she was kept separate from the others but drove me mad trying to get to them as she could smell that they were around. She came into the country well before the 2nd World War (been in the same family from importation) and was already adult, kept in a greenhouse all her life fed on organic lettuce and tomatoes. She was not too mobile and walked low to the ground but ate well. Eventually I had to let her with the others as she was becoming stressed with the constant escape attempts and starting to refuse food. She never looked back. She didn't lay for four or five years and then produced a clutch of torpedo shaped eggs. It took her around three hours all in all and I was worried about her. They were infertile. The next year she laid again and the eggs were slightly more normal looking. The third year she produced her first baby and now she is the first to lay each year and a proper madam. Obviously if you just have the one, you don't have the same problem, with them getting the scent of each other. I'm not sure why there would be a risk of egg binding, but would be interested to know if there is a reasonable explanation. Obviously with Tilly it had to be a choice of keeping her under stress or letting her take her chances with the others and I felt it was unfair to let her suffer ;) 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: type, indoor, tortoise

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users