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Panacur Dosage


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#1 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 07:51 PM

Hi again. One of our Hermanns (George, 4 years old) has just passed a worm x( When we bought the tortoises several months ago, we were provided with a small bottle of Panacur and a disposable plastic syringe to administer the treatment.

On the label it says '0.1 ml per 100g tortoise' but surely that's a negligible amount if your tortoise is 2 years old and weighing 5oz?

Has anybody any suggestions how much I should administer?

Many thanks

#2 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:16 PM

The dosage amount is correct but usually to be most effective pancur wormer needs to be administered via a stomach tube straight into the stomach how you do this without proffesional help i.e a veterinarian i don't no can't help there sorry , i have my own catheter to administer wormer to the stomach , its really difficult to do any other way as the tortoise will not take it voluntary best take to a good vet for it to be administered.
Pancur is very effective to rid your tortoise of a worm burden but it must be repeated in 14 days your vet may be able to use an alternative wormer called systemx this is a single does wormer
Darren

#3 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:20 PM

Cheers for the advice. I have to admit, i'd prefer the vet to administer such treatment rather than some botched DIY worming treatment. What's concerned me is that I weigh both tortoises each month and George has lost a couple of oz's despite eating like a horse. Could this worm burden be the cause? Thanks.

#4 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:25 PM

Yeah i would think so usually when worms are seen in the feaces this generally means an excessive amount in the system which would explain the weight loss your vet should hold the right size catheter to administer the wormer without to much stress
Darren

#5 Guest_blondesarah_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:29 PM

I would see the vet as Darren as said, i take my tortoises to Darren or the vets, when we last went to Darrens it look him about an hour to worm my 4 1/2 inch horsfeild tortoise (she has having none of it) and three men to hold her lol.

#6 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:39 PM

Sounds stressful x( Said tortoise is removed from nice warm pen and taken to a vet's surgery where blokes in white coats perform all sorts of vetenary magic.

You can't help but wonder if the poor tortoise isn't wondering what the hell's going on, thinking 'this wouldn't have happened back in Slovenia' :) LOL

A cautionary tale for anyone thinking of buying a tortoise from a dealer perhaps. Definitely know better now.

#7 Guest_blondesarah_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:43 PM

[updated:LAST EDITED ON 09-02-06 AT 08:45 PM (GMT)]I thought she would be really stress but she wasnt, we wormed her at night and the next day she ate and was walking around as if nothing had happened. Yep you are always better buying a tortoise from a breeder.

#8 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 08:44 PM

Heavy worm burdens are a sure sign this tortoise wasn't captive bred good luck with the trip to the vets hope he piles on the onuces once the unwelcome quests have been given the boot
Darren

#9 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 09:59 AM

Thanks again. Just booked an appointment to see the vet in Manchester. Apparently the veterinary doctor i'm seeing is listed with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and has all the relevant chelonian qualifications. Sounds good but also sounds like BIG bucks! x( LOL

#10 Guest_blondesarah_*

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 10:00 AM

Glad you got him booked in at the vets and let you knwo how you got on. It cost 13 to have my adult red footed tortoises wormed

#11 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 10:07 AM

That sounds like a very reasonable price, hopefully my vet will be as cost-sympathetic as yours :)

#12 Guest_arlene_*

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 03:56 PM

Hi - if your totoises have been in together, make sure you have them both wormed wont you, also the substrate will need changing to prevent reinfection.

Arlene

#13 Guest_lepinsky_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 08:47 PM

I'm a bit worried now. When I had Boris wormed in September he had panacur in a liquid/paste solution that I gave him on his food over a ten-day period. The vet gave me more than he needed on the assumption that some of it would fall by the wayside, but in fact he ate nearly all of it on his favourite foods. Before the worming he had tested positive for oxyurid worms, and after the treatment he tested negative, but I've heard that a negative result doesn't necessarily mean that they don't have worms. Is stomach tubing the only way guaranteed to get rid of worms? Was it wrong to give it to him on his food, and should I have him tested again? (I have given him little bits of pumpkin every now and then on the assumption that it has anti-worming properties.)

Nina

#14 Guest_omare_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 08:50 PM

I never heard that about pumpkin, interesting, where did you hear that Nina.:)

#15 Guest_lepinsky_*

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 07:16 PM

I've heard about pumpkin as a wormer a couple of times on threads on various forums (can't remember which now), but what I heard was that pumpkin contains cucurbitin, which is a natural wormer. I just googled curcurbitgin today and found the following paragraph in a site on supplements in general (not tort related). The section mentions that pumpkin is in the curcurbita family and then says:

"Specifically, cucurbita seeds may help to:
# Eradicate intestinal parasites, such as tapeworms and roundworms. Perhaps the most enduring folk use for cucurbita seeds is to eliminate intestinal parasites, a use largely explained by the eventual discovery of an unusual amino acid called cucurbitin in the seeds. This active ingredient is believed to paralyze the worms over time, forcing them to loose their grip and get expelled from the body."

Boris absolutely loves pumpkin, but I haven't given him very much (just little bits every now and then as a treat) in case it could make him fat.

Nina

#16 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 07:33 PM

Hi Nina
thats really interesting as this chemical is also found in the seeds of grape fruit and the extract can actually be bought as a natural wormer for birds its added to there drinking water
Darren

#17 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 08:55 PM

Hi Nina
The reason stomach tubing is good is it gets the medication straigh into the tortoise the exact quantity needed ,paste works the same but in general tortoises refuse to take it yours obviously didn't mind the taste so in effect it will have worked don't worry your tortoise is wormed ,actually have to say thanks for that message i might try paste with difficult to tube tortoises
Darren

#18 Guest_ston73_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:01 PM

Hi there, when taking Tilley to the vets, they said she was too young to worm.... I am concerned because she was (as I now gather) not captive bred and was imported from slovania.... she is now passing motions and eating like a horse, however, having read 'ALL' of the threads on this forum, I wonder whether it is urgent to get her wormed asap. she is 2 years (approx - so the vet says ?!?!?) and i havent seen any visable worms in her feaces !!
what do you think???
thanks for any info you can give me..
claire :)

#19 Guest_ston73_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:06 PM

To rid of any confusion, I previously posted a question on 'gastric worming', and want to make it clear why I am now asking this...
the first vet I saw said she needed to be wormed gastrically, but because she was not passing anything, there was the concern she had a blockage,, since then, Tilley has been back to the vets and has now passed motions etc.... but this vet has now said (same practice) that she is too young to be wormed...??
Am explaining this because I didnt want anyone to be confused by past postings I have left. I feel so confused by what I have been told by vets. have decided to listen to you lot. you all seem to know so much more and are far more friendlier.
claire (tilley) :)

#20 Guest_p1glet_*

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:26 PM

Hi Claire
if i where you i would wait a while before taking any action on worming tilly due to her bad start, now she is eating and toileting better see if she gains weight in the next month or so if she does then look into worming when you no shes stronger and able to cope with any more medication, i'm sure some else will point you in the right direction as to whether she is to young to worm as i have never had to worm such a young animal before one thing i no is pancur 2.5% has a huge safety margin i'm sure this would be you safest bet only thing i can see for your vet to say she is to young to worm is the difficulty administering the drug via stomach tube perhaps the panacur paste will work for tilly.
Darren




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