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What are the differences between Hermanns and Horsfields


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#1 Guest_Pitcorthie_*

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:38 PM

I am new to this as you can tell;)
What are the main differences between Hermanns and Horsfields?
Which one would be suitable for a beginner?

Thank you
Sharon

#2 Guest_arnhib_*

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 11:36 AM

I'm trying to think which one would be better for Scotland, I know the Horesfeildi doesn't like cold damp weather, so maybe a Hermann would be better, these can't tunnel eaither so less likely to escape, as a russian wouldn't cope at all well without you looking after him if he did get out, I would go for a Hermann I think, you will need plenty of warmth for him even in the summer months night and day so it won't be cheap electrically.
Arnie

#3 Guest_Pitcorthie_*

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 01:21 PM

Thanks Arnie,My hubby prefers Hermanns too:-)

Sharon

#4 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 02:03 PM

Hi there, the weather in Scotland is not much different most of the time from the North West of England. I live on the West side and in the last few years we have had snow twice and once it lasted less than 24 hours. This year if has been hot and sunny for the last two months. I from what I have read and found out in my short time with tortoises Hermanns are fine in Scotland but we have to be careful in Spring and Autumn and take extra care with younger ones. I bring mine in every night including if its very mild in summer. With care Hermanns can do really well.

#5 Guest_Tinkerbell_*

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 01:52 PM

Hermann would be better, these can't tunnel eaither so less likely to escape,

Hi Guys,

Who said Hermanns cant tunnel? My little git tunnelled under two garden fences and went missing for three weeks. His back home safe and sound now but getting a new enclsure built that is tunnel proof. Never underestimate a tortoise's ability to escape! I hope he wasn't trying to tell me something:-) :)

#6 Guest_Queen of Wales_*

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 02:32 PM

Hey everyone,

My Hermanns is also a champion tunneler. Found her in next doors garden last month after she had dug under imbedded concrete posts. Little sod! I nearly had a heart attack trying to find her until I saw her peeping at me from a rockery. Have since reinforced her enclosure by burying breezeblocks around her enclosure then walling around with an overhang. No mean feat when she has an enclosure of 6ft x 10ft! She's spent the last few weeks investigating the walls and my brother has convinced himself she is searching for a weakness. This is like something out of 'Escape from Alcatraz'!

Word of warning to those who are looking into giving a tortoise a home......looking after them properly and ensuring their happiness can be very expensive! Worth every penny in my opinion but those people who think that a tortoise is an easy, low maintanence pet think again!

Joanne.:)

#7 Guest_george_hermann_*

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 07:34 PM

Yeah where have I heard that one before? :)

#8 Guest_arnhib_*

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 08:07 AM

Hahaha
Tunelling Hermann's, yes I agree with you a Hermann can dig down and easily go under a fence, but not tunnel, Russians are built to tunnel underground and can go down quite deep and tunnel for 30 foot or more, they are also round so they can, if they want too turn around and come back. That's the differnece.

Glad you both got your Hermanns back though, I don't know what to suggest to keep your little ones in, I have that plastic coragated edging stuff buried just below the fence, all round the garden, even though most are in enclosures inside the garden I did this as a safety precaution, Make sure there are no little bits of daylight coming under the fence, if they can see that there off.
Before doing this, I had a male Ibera that went into next doors garden a couple of times, then used to go crazy because he couldn't find his way back and used to keep pacing and banging the fence, until either I heard him or the neighbours did, he obviously knew where his bread was buttered
Arnie




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