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This is MY Nevel


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#41 Guest_SueB_*

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 06:34 PM

Not wanting to be argumentative but I am just wondering how the uvb can be increased by the use of a reflector! Has this been tested with a uvb meter. I'm afraid the comparison of being favourable with reptisun 5 makes no difference in my book. Having bred torts for many years and seeing the difference for myself in colour, feeding and activity there is no comparison. I have used them in emergencies for hatchlings but they slow down almost immediately. Just my humble opinion of course.
Sue


#42 Guest_lepinsky_*

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 08:56 PM

You're not being argumentative Sue! I'm really grateful for your input. I'm certainly a newbie at this and would never pretend to know the scientific stuff about UVB outputs, but I was just going by the UK UVB people's site. Several people on other forums had mentioned that reflectors increase the UVB, and then I found this site that seemed to verify that (but for all I know their methods aren't sound). Here's a link to the site:
http://www.uvguide.co.uk/index.htm

If you click on 2005 UV Lighting Survey, and then near the bottom of the screen click on Fluorescent tubes, and then on Survey Results, you'll see the results of the tube survey and the bit on reflectors.

Here's a bit from the paragraph on reflectors:
====================
Reflector Tests

Fig.1 : A fluorescent tube set with a reflector. The use of a reflector can produce a remarkable increase in UVB output at a basking spot. Even a piece of ordinary aluminium foil placed behind a fluorescent tube will significantly improve its performance, but if a reflector, such as the inexpensive clip-on type used for aquarium lighting, is fitted to a UVB tube it is possible to virtually double the output of the tube. The reflector effectively gathers a large percentage of the UV light from the sides and back of the tube, which would otherwise be absorbed by the walls of the vivarium, and redirects this forward into the enclosure.
====================

You and other people on this forum are vastly more experienced than me, and I never meant to imply that the reptisun 10 is any where near as effective as the mercury vapour bulbs -- I was just saying that I like the flexibility I have with it, and in comparison to some of the other fluorescent tubes (like the reptisun 5), the reptisun 10 seems to give better output.

Nina


#43 Guest_SueB_*

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 09:54 PM

Hi Nina
Well I see Martin Dann has done his bit of research which is good enough for me anyday There are so many sites that give info which is misleading that I would far rather hear it from the experts so to speak. I don't keep tubes any more (all over 6 months old) but still have the starters, so may just get one for experimentation purposes and if the reaction of the torts improved it could well be agood standby for those awful busted bulb occurences that always happen in twos.
Sue


#44 Guest_lepinsky_*

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 10:01 PM

Hi Sue,
I think that to have a tube as a standby is OK, but I'm sure that you and all the other experts are right in using the mercury vapour bulbs. It seems to be unanimous that the effect of them on torts is really dramatic. I'll probably switch to them at some time, but with a house that goes from very cold to fairly warm (there is central heating on from 7.45 - 9.45 a.m. and then again from 6 p.m. until 11 p.m., but in between it's freezing - and I have the chillblains to show for it), I like being able to raise and lower my basking bulb to get the right temperature, without having to worry that the bulb might be too far away for the UVB to be effective. But I guess if it's better for Boris then I should at least give it a try.

Nina





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