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worming


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#1 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 09:20 PM

hello every one ?i have two new hatchlings.thinking about worming them before i put them in with my other three,but they are really small!!!not sure i can force their mouth open without hurting them.the vet wont do it.anyone know n easyer way?thanks for reading

#2 Guest_jay_*

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 03:19 PM

Hi,
Have you tried crushing some butternut squosh up into very tiny pieces as this is an excellent wormer and also they enjoy!
Jay and H

#3 Guest_akaha_*

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 09:37 PM

QUOTE (jay @ Jul 19 2009, 03:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,
Have you tried crushing some butternut squosh up into very tiny pieces as this is an excellent wormer and also they enjoy!
Jay and H


can i do this for hermans too...

#4 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 10:12 PM

QUOTE (jay @ Jul 19 2009, 03:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,
Have you tried crushing some butternut squosh up into very tiny pieces as this is an excellent wormer and also they enjoy!
Jay and H



It's the seeds that are the wormer, not the flesh.

#5 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 20 March 2010 - 09:13 PM

Why do you want to worm small tortoises?
I dont worm my tortoises unless I actually see worms. I prefer not to medicate unless really needed.

#6 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 20 March 2010 - 10:51 PM




You only see them if there is an overload. Worming annually is advised by many experts including the Tortoise Trust and the RCVS. It's the same as putting horses into the same pasture without worming them, it becomes expensive wink.gif

#7 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 03:35 AM

this is an old thread have learned loads since then.and theese torts are fine.they have the all clear

#8 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 10:09 PM

I just did a worming treatment. I sent a sample away to the Royal Dick Vets School in Edinburgh and I got written results. The sample had a heavy burden of pinworms in it. This worm is too small to see except with microscopes. I decided to treat them because there was a heavy burden. If it was a small amount I might not have.

I don't believe in treating them every year like some keepers do. I got the test done because my largest tort gained good weight in the summer but lost a lot of it in the autumn and I was worried. She made her hibernation OK but I had to keep it to 8 weeks.

I'll see if she keeps her weight gain better this year after being wormed.

#9 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 10:23 AM

QUOTE (Ozric @ Mar 22 2010, 10:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just did a worming treatment. I sent a sample away to the Royal Dick Vets School in Edinburgh and I got written results. The sample had a heavy burden of pinworms in it. This worm is too small to see except with microscopes. I decided to treat them because there was a heavy burden. If it was a small amount I might not have.

I don't believe in treating them every year like some keepers do. I got the test done because my largest tort gained good weight in the summer but lost a lot of it in the autumn and I was worried. She made her hibernation OK but I had to keep it to 8 weeks.

I'll see if she keeps her weight gain better this year after being wormed.



I know it's only my opinion but it's people as well who are at risk. A lot of these pinworms, ascarids and strongyles are transmissable to humans and can cause blindness in children and babies. I wold never risk that and much prefer to take the advice of my vet, organisations such as the tortoise trust and people doing observations such as the RCVS and the Dick school. As I say, just my take on it. My kids and grandchildren are precious to me.

#10 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 07:21 PM

Think it has to be personal choice, but if you are using correct hand washing hygeine after handling your torts then there shouldn't be a problem wink.gif

#11 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 08:23 PM

QUOTE (Dawn @ Mar 24 2010, 07:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Think it has to be personal choice, but if you are using correct hand washing hygeine after handling your torts then there shouldn't be a problem wink.gif


Ah but my torts are free range and my little four and five year old are not going to think about washing hands if they have an itchy nose or something while out playing.

#12 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 10:51 PM

In my case at least it was done for the benefit of the tortoises rather than people. Of course I cannot be certain that the parasites were at a level in the tortoises where they were causing harm and this is the tricky bit because I've read that the wild ones often have a certain amount of parasites and its not necessarily a problem for the tort.

The results of the test that I had done were very specific about the type of worm and eggs that were present and also it was described as a heavy burden. Although I've done the worming treatment now I should wash hands carefully after handling tortoises. After all the worming treatment might not even have totally wiped them out and the tortoises might have some other bacteria or whatever on them that wouldn't agree with a human being.

But then again, I think that as adults we shouldn't be constantly telling children to disinfect their hands every two minutes and make them frightenend of playing out in the garden which is surely an excellent thing for kids to do.

#13 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 12:51 PM

QUOTE (Ozric @ Mar 24 2010, 10:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
this is the tricky bit because I've read that the wild ones often have a certain amount of parasites and its not necessarily a problem for the tort.

The results of the test that I had done were very specific about the type of worm and eggs that were present and also it was described as a heavy burden. Although I've done the worming treatment now I should wash hands carefully after handling tortoises. After all the worming treatment might not even have totally wiped them out and the tortoises might have some other bacteria or whatever on them that wouldn't agree with a human being.

But then again, I think that as adults we shouldn't be constantly telling children to disinfect their hands every two minutes and make them frightenend of playing out in the garden which is surely an excellent thing for kids to do.



It's quite true that in the wild a few worms will not harm a tortoise as they travel great distances and therefore are not continually infecting themselves, in a garden situation though the risk of contamination goes up by several hundred percent so I am told by the RCVS, which is why it makes sense to keep the burden down artificially.
My grandchildren love playing in the garden and love watching the tortoises too but as one of them has been at deaths door several times I'm afraid her needs will always be put before the torts. She's really good with washing hands and not touching but I would rather be safe than sorry. I would be devastated if anything happened to my torts, but I would rehome every one if I thought they still posed a threat in any way. That's why I said it's just my way of dealing with them wink.gif

#14 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 09:01 PM

I think its really a case of do what you think is best, and certainly do what you think is best for your own individual situation wink.gif




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