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humidity in fridge...??


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#1 Guest_avons82_*

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 09:46 AM

hi!

i read on the tort protection site, that the humidity inside the fridge should be at a certain level throughout hibernation. It recommends buying a hygrometer to measure it and keep it stable.

Does anyone else use one of these..? Do i need to get one for my fridge set up?

many thanks! :blush:

#2 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 08:59 PM

Up to you...I've never used one and i've fridge hibernated mine for last 3 years :rolleyes:

#3 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 10:47 PM

Hi. My undrestanding is that humidity is important during hibernation because this is directly connected to the weight loss that takes place, especially in the fridge.

Paula helped me realise last year that it is not easy to raise the level of humidity in a fridge because the air is cold, and simply will not hold very much water in it. So the bowls of water which some of us might leave sitting in the fridge in an effort to raise humidity do not evaporate.

My hygrometer tells me that the humidity in the fridge is about 35% which is almost certainly too low.

My answer to your question is that a hygrometer is useful to have if keeping Hermanns in general. But this is really only the case if we think that humidity is important for them and we try and do things to influence the humidity levels.

Its probably a lot more important for really small ones than it is for aduts.

#4 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 01:10 PM

Jon, I'll get back to you later with this one as I did have it written down what humidity the fridge should be..... just gotta remember where I wrote it :rolleyes:

#5 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 07:14 PM

oh great!!! As if i wasnt worried already!!!! Humidity???



#6 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 08:35 PM

:D Mark, hang on in there lovely, that sounded like the groan of a broken man!! :D

They're no trouble.... LOL!

Paula x

#7 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 10:58 AM

he he... sorry. So how do you control the humidity of a fridge...?

#8 Guest_Lin_*

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:22 PM

I must admit I've never done anything about the humidity in the fridge

#9 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:36 PM

well i now have a fridge for the boys! 3 yrs old and free to a good home!

#10 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 11:41 AM

Controlling the humidity in the fridge is difficult. I've tried having an open bowl of water in the fridge but this didn't help in my case because the water did not evaporate from th bowl.

Another idea is to use a substrate which is slightly damp. Some people are worried that a damp substrate might not be a good thing for the tortoise in other ways and could affect the shell. For that reason I wouldn't suggest anyone should make the substrate damp but I'm interested in this idea. A soil and sand substrate can easily be made damp but with other materials it would not be suitable.

#11 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:45 PM

which brings us to what people are using in thier boxes. what is best.

Some have said paper. some have said hemp??? some say use the soil or substrate they are used to.

Any that are supposed to be best?


#12 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 10:11 PM


Hi Mark,

I am new to hibernation too. I am going for the soil/sand mix directly from their table.... in the hope that the familiar smell will be of some comfort... but this is only an idea, I have no proof it will make them any happier!

Paula x

#13 Guest_Lin_*

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 08:35 AM

I'm going to use aubiose, which is the substrate they're used to.

#14 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 09:15 AM

yes, we are leaning towards using soil so they can bury down a bit if they want.

hey , just another thought ?? When hibernating your supposed to check on them how often?? Also when they are little how do you check if they have not wee,d? Do you pick them up and have a feel round the substrate? I dont think i have ever noticed wee on the substrate.

Do those questions sound silly? ha. x

#15 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 08:24 PM

I don't think the question is at all silly and Markf is right in that its not so easy to see when a tort has pee'd if it is hibernated in a soil type substrate. Even so I do prefer that to other materials.

I tried placing a small plastic hibernation box with holes in the fridge complete with damp substrate of soil and sand. All thats missing is a tortoise. After a couple of weeks the substrate is much drier than it was. A lot of the moisture has disappeared out of the substrate. And the humidity level in the fridge is only 25-30% which is lower than I want it.

I've now got an open bowl of water sitting in the fridge and I'll see if the relative humidity rises. Last year this didn't seem to help much at all.

#16 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 09:07 PM

Ooooo, that's an interesting find Oz! :blink:

I shall be following your experiment with the water with interest as from what I read... and thought I understood, I didn't think it possible. Perhaps the evaporation would be a fairly small amount, but any increase in the humidity would be worth a try?

Did you measure the humidity before putting the box of moist soil in? If so, was it lower then than the 25-30%?

Paula x

#17 Guest_avons82_*

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 10:05 AM

so do i need a hygrometer to measure the humidity? what do you all use? :blink:

#18 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 08:06 PM

The humidity in this fridge when its settled at the 'target' temperature seems to be fixed somewhere between 25 and 30% no matter what. The bowl of water has been in there for days now and it looks just as full to me as when I placed it in there. The relative humidity hasn't risen.

I'm sure the damp substrate in the wee box looks drier now than what it was but Paula is right there is a hole in my data. I didn't have a reading for before I put that box in. Maybe the substrate looks different because the water has formed the bits into larger blobs but is still there. I should have weighed the substrate before it went in.

Someone on another forum claims that air can hold water at any temperature. I'll see if they can explain how this works. Other people have suggested large sponges and things like this which surely make no difference. How can we get cold air to hold more moisture in it? Like a very slight fog. :blink:

#19 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 08:56 PM

Hi Oz,

What I think I understand, is that the cold air will only hold so much moisture.
Any more will collect on the condenser at the back of the fridge and trickle out of the hole thingy at the bottom. So perhaps the soil has dried a bit, but that the moisture from it rather than to sit in the air has collected on the cold condenser. :blink:
Perhaps.... :D

Paula x

#20 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 12:01 AM

If you think about a tortoise hibernating naturally outdoors, the humidity would be pretty high over winter, therefore if using anything drying or absorbent such as paper or hemp I always give it a periodic fine mist spraying. Fridges are quite drying at the best of times, so added to an absorbent material I would be inclined to be a bit worried about excessive weight loss due to dehydration. Since I started to hibernate tortoises with higher humidity I have seen much clearer urates on waking in the spring.
Just my take on things of course and based on results over 25 years or so.




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