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#1 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 10:54 AM

one of my females toe nails have got long nails.i have trimed them today only about 2mm of each nail.just wondering when it will be safe to trim again?

thanks

bruce

#2 Guest_Robink_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 11:59 AM

Bruce, I would personally leave it, they will wear down naturally when they go at outside. If you've taken the tips off they should be fine.

#3 Guest_wilsonathome_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 12:11 PM

you'll find that a females nails will be longer on the back as she needs them to dig nests smile.gif

#4 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 12:34 PM

thanks for that.this female dose not walk like other torts do.when i got her she was really poorly and could hardly walk.she has inproved 100% in the 18 months i have had her.she sort of walks with the sides of her feet where as the others stomp about.that is why her nails are so long as they dont get worn down.she is in a 6ft by 3ft table half of it is slate the other half soil.thanks again

#5 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 01:00 PM

QUOTE (brucefairweather @ Feb 6 2010, 12:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
thanks for that.this female dose not walk like other torts do.when i got her she was really poorly and could hardly walk.she has inproved 100% in the 18 months i have had her.she sort of walks with the sides of her feet where as the others stomp about.that is why her nails are so long as they dont get worn down.she is in a 6ft by 3ft table half of it is slate the other half soil.thanks again



Hi Bruce
How old is this tort (sorry if I missed this)?
I would use terracotta if possible in place as slate as it is slightly more abrasive. If the torts feet contact it all the time though them maybe best stick with slate. Make sure this is not under the lamp though wink.gif Does she walk oddly as a result of poor dietry care ie MBD or because her nails were too long? There is a wonderful little battery operated nail grinder available from pedipaws (half price in Wilkinsons right now or even cheaper on ebay) It will take two people (one to hold and one to grind) but works so slowly that you will clearly see the quick come into view before any harm is done. I have used this succesfully on a dog and on a rehabbed tort with very odd sideways worn nails. Give me a shout if you want more details wink.gif

#6 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 01:49 PM

hi sue,not sure how old she is?it says 2005 on her paper work but she is laying fertile eggs now so i am not so sure.saying that though she dose look like she has grown pritty fast by the look of her.
i think the long nails are a result of her MBD.with her not walking rite her nails dont touch the slate.i have been cutting the tips of every few months but not making much of a change in them.if i could get them rite down .she mite walk better i dont know


bruce

#7 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 02:00 PM

QUOTE (brucefairweather @ Feb 6 2010, 01:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hi sue,not sure how old she is?it says 2005 on her paper work but she is laying fertile eggs now so i am not so sure.saying that though she dose look like she has grown pritty fast by the look of her.
i think the long nails are a result of her MBD.with her not walking rite her nails dont touch the slate.i have been cutting the tips of every few months but not making much of a change in them.if i could get them rite down .she mite walk better i dont know


bruce





Given this info Bruce, I would say they are not going to wear down naturally then and may need a helping hand as she is not putting her feet down correctly to keep them back. Do you have a vet you can trust? If so it may be worth asking him to do them for you and stopping the bleeding (which WILL occur) at the same time and then trying to keep on top of it by providing correct substrate as you are and hoping this will assist in her using correct leg position from now on. When torts are used to sliding along as in MBD the nails often grow incorrectly. It's not just the walking on them wrong, but because the body lacks calcium they may even have grown poorly from the nail bed sad.gif I would use a pedipaws to be honest as the quick will recede gradually if it is approached in this way, giving chance for it to grow back properly if she does finally learn to walk properly.
Hope this helps


#8 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 02:20 PM

my vet wont even worm the torts i have to do it myself.being in the north coast of scotland i have not got much of a choice in where to take her.can i ask what pedapaws is??

#9 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 02:34 PM

Hi Bruce

Just wondering if you have a picture of these long nails?
And how they dont touch/reach the slate evenly, just wondering:0)

#10 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 02:48 PM

QUOTE (brucefairweather @ Feb 6 2010, 02:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
my vet wont even worm the torts i have to do it myself.being in the north coast of scotland i have not got much of a choice in where to take her.can i ask what pedapaws is??



Hi Bruce - here is a link. As I say it works very slowly so if looking closely you can detect the change in nail substance before you hit a vein.
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item2a039db07e


and............................ a bit of a naff video but gives an idea of what it does. Ignore the daft remarks at the end these are probably from someone struggling with a wild rottweiler lol

I worked in dog grooming for many years and used the same principal using a bimdrill but this is much milder and safer.
If the neails are deformed in the way that I am thinking, they are worn slightly on the side but not enough to stop the length, is this right?

#11 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 03:57 PM

QUOTE (wizzasmum @ Feb 6 2010, 02:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Bruce - here is a link. As I say it works very slowly so if looking closely you can detect the change in nail substance before you hit a vein.
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item2a039db07e


and............................ a bit of a naff video but gives an idea of what it does. Ignore the daft remarks at the end these are probably from someone struggling with a wild rottweiler lol

I worked in dog grooming for many years and used the same principal using a bimdrill but this is much milder and safer.
If the neails are deformed in the way that I am thinking, they are worn slightly on the side but not enough to stop the length, is this right?

that looks a great tool think i will have to give it a try.will try get a pic soon

#12 Guest_Ozric_*

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 05:01 PM

Bruce I know you are a long way from it but there is a good tortoise vet at the Dick Vet school in Edinburgh. He is the advisor to the Tortoise Protection Group as well.

#13 Guest_Ilkeston_*

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 11:34 AM

QUOTE (wizzasmum @ Feb 6 2010, 01:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Bruce
How old is this tort (sorry if I missed this)?
I would use terracotta if possible in place as slate as it is slightly more abrasive. If the torts feet contact it all the time though them maybe best stick with slate. Make sure this is not under the lamp though wink.gif Does she walk oddly as a result of poor dietry care ie MBD or because her nails were too long? There is a wonderful little battery operated nail grinder available from pedipaws (half price in Wilkinsons right now or even cheaper on ebay) It will take two people (one to hold and one to grind) but works so slowly that you will clearly see the quick come into view before any harm is done. I have used this succesfully on a dog and on a rehabbed tort with very odd sideways worn nails. Give me a shout if you want more details wink.gif



I'd just like to point out my inexperience in these matters by drawing attention to the fact that I have no idea what MBD is! blush.gif ... Hi, could I just ask what MBD is please? Don't think I've heard of it before. Thanks Everyone. Take care!

#14 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 05:30 PM

QUOTE (Ilkeston @ Feb 9 2010, 11:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'd just like to point out my inexperience in these matters by drawing attention to the fact that I have no idea what MBD is! blush.gif ... Hi, could I just ask what MBD is please? Don't think I've heard of it before. Thanks Everyone. Take care!



Metabolic bone disease - characterised by 'often' flattened lumpy shells, 'sometimes' soft shells, shells that tail off to wards the rear, animal walking low to the ground, poorly formed nails, legs held in strange positions and other less obvious signs.
Hope this helps




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