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help!!! an egg has just been delivered!!


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#1 Guest_tasmin_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 07:09 PM

Arghhhh!! can some one help me please?! my herman just laid an egg an hour ago. I have taken the egg out and kept it upright in an ice cream container, and the egg is resting on a damp piece of cotton wool, inside a vivarium. I can't get any vermiculite (spelling?) until tomorrow as the pet shops are now closed (I love her timing aye).

Ok, it has been two years since she last had eggs and I can't remember what I have to do. I must put a bowl under the heat bulb to try and keep it humid, and spray the egg with water lightly about twice a day. Is this right?

What temperature should I keep the egg at? and do I dim the light at night or keep the basking light on constantly? also, the vitamin light (strip light) do I keep this on?

Please help me! I'm a damsel in distress!!! lol!!

xx

#2 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:22 PM

hi have you got an incubator?if you have then the temps are 28 31 degrees did the tortoise just drop the egg or did she digg an nest?you want to get a still air incubator and not fan assisted one.the humidity should be about 70ish.good luck

#3 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:28 PM

You can get vermiculite from garden centres and places like B+Q, bit late now though ;)
As Bruce says keep the temps to around 30 degrees. Don't spray the egg or mould could form, so long as you have a humid environment that will be fine. Light is not desirable as in the wild they would be buried but will do for now. Try using a heat mat on a thermostat to give heat. Don't drop the temps overnight as the egg will fail otherwise. In nature they will likely frop a degree or two but switching the light off will be too drastic. You don't need the strip light at all.
Hope this helps

#4 Guest_tasmin_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:29 PM

Hi thank you for replying! I have got them in a vivarium, which I will be incubating them in. She didn't dig a nest she just dropped them. What does this mean? any idea how I can keep it humid in there?




#5 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:46 PM

not sure about incubating in a viv.a poly box with a heat mat a stat a baking tray and a tub of water would be better.do you have deep soil for your tort to dig a nest?once my tort dropped her eggs and they were all infertile.other times she layed she dug a nest and i got fertile eggs.have you got a male? has she been in contact with an other male in the last two years or so?

#6 Guest_tasmin_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:51 PM

Hmm I guess it is a bit late now! doh! although if I'm careful I could change the "bedding", I can't leave them on cotton wool can I? with the heat mat should I put the eggs which are in an icecream tub on top of it? rather than the heat bulb?
I have just switched the strip light off, and I won't be turning the heat down. Thanks ever so much :-)

#7 Guest_tasmin_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 08:54 PM

I will try and get a poly box tomorrow from a garden centre. No I haven't got soil with the torts, only the wood chips which I have always used. She laid eggs about 2 years ago and they were infertile, I since separated the male and female because of this but he had his wicked way with her when they were both out walking together (I only took my eyes off them for 5 mins!) so they may be fertile, but in a way I hope not because I don't think I could cope with 3 hatchlings dying on me! :-(

#8 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 10:12 PM

If they were to hatch, what makes you think they would die? To be honest this method is a bit hit and miss and you would do better to do as Bruce says and use the polybox method. I would also get your torts into a better habitat to be honest, as if they are breeding age they need to be able to act as they would in the wild, which means deep substrate which she can dig a hole in to nest properly. Tortoises often hold on to eggs if there is no suitable nesting area and only drop them when they are desperate, which can lead to egg binding and death.

#9 Guest_tasmin_*

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 12:54 PM

Hello, I believe there is a chance they may die after reading about a lot of peoples results on this forum it is very difficult to get them to hatch. I have been debating for a long time whether they would be better re-homed or not and have just bought 2 indoor rabbit cages for the tortoises to try and make life happier for them, but listening to what you say they it still isn't good enough so I am going to have to re-think their future with me again which saddens me. I am not keeping them together so eggs in the future won't be a problem.

#10 Guest_brucefairweather_*

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 02:26 PM

dont be put of by my bad luck.its not put me of although it is haert braking when things go wrong

#11 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 04:36 PM

Over twelve years ago, I incubated some eggs in an airing cupboard:0) Four hatched.
I now have my homemade incubator, and it has served me well since. The first one is now laying her own eggs.





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