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Shell Moisturizer ????


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#1 Guest_lovebug009_*

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 02:27 AM

Hi newbie question...I saw a shell moisturizer in the pet store, is it safe and or necessary? Can a natural oil be used? What do you do?

#2 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 05:16 AM

Morning, you don't need to use any of these products!! They are yet another way for pet shops to make money angry.gif IF you feel the need to clean the shell use an old soft tooth/nail brush and give it a brush when he's having a bath in plain water

#3 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:26 PM



I read from WolfgangWegehaupt's fantastic book...

The sutures between the scutes are filled with a concentration of growth cells that continuously 'add on' to the respective scutes. These sutures are relatively thin and sensitive to mechanical impact, because they are situated directly above the vessel rich periosteum. This is the reason why live tortoises should not be scrubbed with a hard brush. The pain threshold of the periosteum is comparable to the thin skin on our shins.

So as Dawn says, please go gently and use a soft brush. smile.gif

Paula x

#4 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE (Hettie @ Apr 9 2010, 05:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I read from WolfgangWegehaupt's fantastic book...

The sutures between the scutes are filled with a concentration of growth cells that continuously 'add on' to the respective scutes. These sutures are relatively thin and sensitive to mechanical impact, because they are situated directly above the vessel rich periosteum. This is the reason why live tortoises should not be scrubbed with a hard brush. The pain threshold of the periosteum is comparable to the thin skin on our shins.

So as Dawn says, please go gently and use a soft brush. smile.gif

Paula x
I was just about to say that lol - I never ever brush the areas of new growth - would not want to affect it in any way.

#5 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 08:33 PM

Agree, I've never actually used a brush of any sort on mine, if they are dirtier than normal I use my hand to gently wash their shells whilst they are in the bath

#6 Guest_lovebug009_*

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:06 AM

QUOTE (Dawn @ Apr 9 2010, 07:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Agree, I've never actually used a brush of any sort on mine, if they are dirtier than normal I use my hand to gently wash their shells whilst they are in the bath

Thanks, I didn't think it was needed, but when I saw the product I second guessed myself. I have noticed in the 2 weeks I have had her that her shell is looking moister and healthier especially after her bath, so I will just keep doing that.

#7 Guest_wizzasmum_*

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 09:53 AM

QUOTE (Dawn @ Apr 9 2010, 09:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Agree, I've never actually used a brush of any sort on mine, if they are dirtier than normal I use my hand to gently wash their shells whilst they are in the bath



Exactly! If God had meant them to be shiny and clean looking, he would have provided torty car washes in their natural habitat - well he did in a way as they get clean by walking under low growing bushes and plants.

#8 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE (wizzasmum @ Apr 10 2010, 10:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Exactly! If God had meant them to be shiny and clean looking, he would have provided torty car washes in their natural habitat - well he did in a way as they get clean by walking under low growing bushes and plants.



pmsl!!!!! laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif




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