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Quarantine question?


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#1 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 03:48 PM

Hi Everyone

Another question, I recently spoke to a guy who is a member of the British Chelonia Group, I was saying that i was thinking of getting another tortoise to go with mine. He said that the advice that vets and the Chelonia Group are now giving is to keep the new tortoise in quarantine for 6 months, even if healthy etc to stop passing on any parasites, runny nose and other probs to existing tortoise. Anybody have any views on this?

Paula

#2 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 05:39 PM

QUOTE (paula271066 @ Jul 6 2010, 04:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Everyone

Another question, I recently spoke to a guy who is a member of the British Chelonia Group, I was saying that i was thinking of getting another tortoise to go with mine. He said that the advice that vets and the Chelonia Group are now giving is to keep the new tortoise in quarantine for 6 months, even if healthy etc to stop passing on any parasites, runny nose and other probs to existing tortoise. Anybody have any views on this?

Paula

Hi Paula,
I think that's sound, sensible advice and I agree with it wholeheartedly.
Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#3 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 06:52 PM



Hi Paula,

I think 6 months is the minimum amount of time I've read to keep them seperated.

Paula x


#4 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 06:55 PM

The four new rehomers I have, are having this season for quaranteening. I will put one of my males with them next year.

#5 Guest_italytors_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 01:20 PM

Hi Paula,

As far as I am aware the quarantine period should be 1 year. That means you can check the tortoise over after a hibernation period too, which sometimes accentuates any underlying problems (if there are any).

Always best to be on the safe side before putting it in with healthy ones !!! smile.gif

M









#6 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 02:29 PM

Thanks for all your replies, will definately quarantine when we get another. Had some information sent to me from British Chelonia Group including a diet sheet, this is were i get so confused with whats right for tort and not as most of the info seems to be conflicting, but this is the diet sheet i have received.

DIET SHEET FOR TORTOISES

The following is to give you some ideas about the types of food that tortoise owners have seen their tortoises eat. Not all the foods are available throughout the year, so feed foods that are in season. Not all tortoises will eat all the foods that are suggested as they may never have come across them before or they may not suit that particular tortoises palate but a varied diet should always be offered.

GREEN VEGETABLES

Brocoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower leaves, curly kale, peas, beans such as french or beans, spring greens, cucumber, endives, chinese cabbage leaves, lettuce watercress, spinach or french chard. Tinned or frozen veg can also be give, frozen food must always be defrosted in warm water first. Cooked frozen peas and beans are a favourite when fed indoors when the weather outside is foul.

FIRM VEG AND BOILED VEG

Beetroot, carrot and parsnips should be grated, some tortoises will eat cold boiled potatoes and others prefer their cabbage etc. cooked too. Freshly sprouted bean sprouts are a rich source of proteirn and are relished by most tortoises. Try cooked boiled rice, either brwon or white. Also plain cooked pasta. Just use plain water for cooking, do not add salt etc.

FRUITS

Apricots, blackberries, currants, dates, figs (fresh as well as dried), gooseberries, grapes, mandarin segments, melon, peaches, pears, plums, oranges, raisins, raspberries, strawberries, tomatoes and some types of sweet eating apple are relished. Tinned or defrosted fruits are also welcomed but wash the syrup off first, tinned tomatoes are a cheap alternative to expensive out of season fresh tomatoes. Avoid feeding an excess of bananas which can cause digestive upsets.

WINTER FRUIT JELLY

When over wintering (non hibernating) a toroise, make a jelly as a treat. Dissolve half a blackcurrant jelly in hot water, add the appropriate amount of cold water and pur over a cup of mixed fruit and veg, ie currants, raisins, grapes, chopped apple, date, fig, grated carrot etc, some boiled rice or cereal can b e added, allow it to set and offer it as a treat to your tortoise. As there are so few vitamins at this time of year the addition of a vitamin mineral supplement such as vionate to the jelly will be of great benefit.

LEAVES OF BUSHES AND SHRUBS ETC

The leaves from all of these garden shrubs are all safe to be fed, buddlia, lupin, rose, brample, runner beans, ice plants and sedums. Other garden plants are suitable but do check first that they are not poisonous.

GARDEN WEEDS

Free ranging tortoises will eat any of the campions, dandelion buttercup, clover, chickweed, groundsel, plantains, hawkweed, bindweed and many species of grass (make sure no weed killers have been used.


????????????????

Paula wacko.gif

#7 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 06:22 PM

Did you say you got this diet sheet from the BCG????? Is it for med torts???? If so then I am gobsmacked!!!!

#8 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 06:48 PM

QUOTE (Dawn @ Jul 7 2010, 07:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did you say you got this diet sheet from the BCG????? Is it for med torts???? If so then I am gobsmacked!!!!



#9 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 06:55 PM

Yeah its from BGC, letter headed paper etc, the guy that i spoke to from BGC re getting another tort said he wud post some info to me etc cos hes a member. It doesnt say which type of tortoise its for, its headed as ive typed it 'diet sheet for tortoises'

paula

#10 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 07:05 PM

The BCG s diet sheet has been like this for years and years. Most older keepers know to avoid like the plague. And never ever recommend it:0)
The BCG committee are probably all over a certain age, and refuse to move into the 21st century.
But they do have some good members, who also dont follow the diet sheet.

#11 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 07:56 PM

QUOTE (cyberangel @ Jul 7 2010, 08:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The BCG s diet sheet has been like this for years and years. Most older keepers know to avoid like the plague. And never ever recommend it:0)
The BCG committee are probably all over a certain age, and refuse to move into the 21st century.
But they do have some good members, who also dont follow the diet sheet.



#12 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 10:23 PM

Hi Paula,
I think Victor is 3 years old and you haven't got him long. So if your getting him a young companion probably better not to hibernate them just yet!!!I'd overwinter both torts. However I would quarantine and keep the torts seperate for a year!!! biggrin.gif
Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#13 Guest_Dawn_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 06:46 AM

Sorry Freddie wub.gif I have to disagree with you on that one rolleyes.gif there is no reason why Victor can't be hibernated, as by then she would have had him for a few months, and provided he's eating and has gained weight (and Paula is confident enough) then he should really be allowed to do what he would naturally do. It is actually very hard to overwinter torts as they are 'designed' to sleep for a certain amount of time and their digestive system finds it very hard to cope if they are overfed.

Obviously it has to be Paula's choice, but I know from experience that hibernation deeply benefits the tortoise

#14 Guest_Lin_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 07:22 AM

Quarantining: The thing is, do we practice what we preach????

#15 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 07:34 AM

QUOTE (Lin @ Jul 8 2010, 08:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Quarantining: The thing is, do we practice what we preach????


I do as I dont want my tortoises to get any nasties. Plus I am of the older generation where you do things the right way:0)
I can honestly say I have never put a tortoise straight in with my group. It used to be three months quarantining but now I give it the whole season, depending on when I get the rehomer.

#16 Guest_paula271066_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 08:54 AM

QUOTE (Dawn @ Jul 8 2010, 07:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sorry Freddie wub.gif I have to disagree with you on that one rolleyes.gif there is no reason why Victor can't be hibernated, as by then she would have had him for a few months, and provided he's eating and has gained weight (and Paula is confident enough) then he should really be allowed to do what he would naturally do. It is actually very hard to overwinter torts as they are 'designed' to sleep for a certain amount of time and their digestive system finds it very hard to cope if they are overfed.

Obviously it has to be Paula's choice, but I know from experience that hibernation deeply benefits the tortoise



#17 Guest_italytors_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 10:30 AM

I think it is amazing that the BCG post diet advice like that, knowing that the people who log on to that page are mostly people raising tortoises for the first time !! unsure.gif How sad .... and misleading !
Let's hope they look around other web-sites before actually feeding their torties !!!

As for quarantining, I think it is a "must".

#18 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 02:57 PM

Quote Dawn 'there is no reason why victor can't be hibernated'

Hi Dawn,
I agree that hibernation has great benefits for torts.But I don't think it would do any harm to overwinter victor and his prospective companion for the first year of ownership.He will need time to get used to his new routine and adjust to his new environment and I think it would also be just a health and safety precaution to wait a year until he has finally settled in. As you mentioned torts need to eat well and increase their fat stores to get them through hibernation and a small, young and relatively new tort like victor could be a little vulnerable.It's only my opinion Dawn although I have heard this expressed by others.But there are differing views on the subject and as you say the decision lies ultimately with Paula. All we can do as keepers is advise and hopefully lend a helping hand!!! biggrin.gif
Kind Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#19 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 04:22 PM

Sorry Freddie

I have to agree with Dawn. There is no reason why the tortoise cant be hibernated this Winter. What do you think they do in the wild:0)
I will add, I dont hibernate any of mine that are under 30grms as that scares me, but I know keepers who do. This last Winter, I didnt hibernate three hatchlings as they hatched in August, and were still under 30grms by Christmas. This year mine hatched a lot earlier, and weighed a lot more, so they should be going down this next hibernation:0)
To many keepers use the excuse of not having their tortoises long, because they are frightend to hibernate them. If they were that fragile, they would not have survived for hundreds of years.

#20 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 05:00 PM

Hi Sandy,
As an experienced keeper who has hibernated young torts I would bow to your superior knowledge!!!Perhaps I'm being a bit overcautious but this approach has always kept my own tort. 'Billiejo' in good stead. However, it is also true that she is an adult tort who has always been hibernated.It just seems to me that these younger and smaller captive torts. are a little more vulnerable than their wilder cousins. Also,they are not yet fully developed. But ,perhaps as you say they are a lot more hardier than we give them credit for.Anyway Sandy,your insights and experience are always enlightening.Thank you once again for your reply.I am always learning....
Kind Regards
Freddy




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