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gammy eye.... again


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#1 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 05:42 PM

Just about to start getting sorted for hibernation and onion has decided to get his gammy eye issue he had in the summer. One of his eyes struggles to open properly first thing in the morning, it doesnt weep or anything, it just doesnt look quite right. The last time he had this we treated it with cod liver oil and it cleared up a treat.

With the hibernation supposedly looming, im now feeling i should get it checked, because i want it okeyed before hibernating him.

Ive never taken them to a vet, so i have to get that all sorted out! But i was thinking, in this cold weather, how do you get them to a vet, wait with them and get them home without them getting to cold! What a pain.

Or the easy option. Self treat it like we did last time and over winter him!!


(Yes lets buy some tortoises, must be a doddle of a pet to look after!!!!!)

#2 Guest_gail69_*

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 06:19 PM

Hi Mark

I can't advise on if you should take your tortoise to the vet or not. That has to be your decision. However, If you do decide to take him, i usually put mine in a box with some straw. I have found that the torts are fine in the car because it is warm with the heater on. Then for the length of time they are in the vets they are usually ok. They just slow down a bit. And then they warm up again on the journey home.

So usually they are fine and I think we worry more than the tortoises do. rolleyes.gif

Gail
xx

PS, I love your little quote at the bottom about tortoises being a doddle. Ha ha.

#3 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 09:15 PM



Hi Mark,

I once had the same 'problem' with Hettie and going to the vets, in the deepest darkest winter a couple of years ago I used an old hot water bottle with hot water from the tap (not kettle) wrapped in towels to provide a warm spot.
However I more recently discovered that a cooler torty will sit more quietly in the box while travelling, especially if kept dark so that the shadows racing over the moving car doesn't stress them out.
They really are no trouble! laugh.gif rolleyes.gif

Paula x

#4 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 12:23 AM

Hi Mark,
I agree with Paula. I bring Billiejo to the vets in shoebox. It has a lid on top with holes for ventilation. The dark cool box seems to have a calming effect on her and does the trick wink.gif
Kind Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#5 Guest_jay_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 06:35 PM

Hi Mark
I hope Onion's eye soon get's better,do you have a good local vet?,what a worry for you especially just before hibernation.
Jay,H,Becky and Humpty

#6 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 06:40 PM

A normal car heat is fine, as you dont really want them to be too warm, as they can stress more when they are active. Better to be on the colder side and more sleepy than active. Once you get to the vets it will warm them up quite quickly:0)
It depends on the distance you have to travel as to how or what you take them in. A short distance a shoe box is fine, longer journeys a slightly larger one would be better. It also depends on the size of the tortoise.

#7 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 08:14 PM

I usually use a larger type shoebox for my adult tortoise. The box is a convenient size as I have a 2-3 hour journey to the vets by public transport. wink.gif
Kind Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#8 Guest_Queen of Wales_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 09:26 PM

Hello there!

I had the same problem about two years ago. A totally gunked up eye in October. I decided to over-winter my baby on the advice of my vet.

After an anti-biotic jab from the vet, I bathed the eye daily with saline (i'm a nurse so get my hands on everything. Boiled salt water is fine.) and sneaked chopped parsley into my tortoises feed (great for infections of any sort as full of vitamin A) and she was fine by Christmas day.

I really do think that the saline and parsley did the trick without the vets intervention.

Hope this is of some help.

wub.gif


#9 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 09:39 PM



Can you buy Saline at a chemist? Might be a handy thing for a torty 1st aid box.

Paula x


#10 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 10:20 PM

Sounds like a great idea. wink.gif
Kind Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#11 Guest_Queen of Wales_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 09:48 AM

I think you can buy it in an aerosol from the chemist but the ones I use are in individual plastic vials. Boiled water and salt is just as good though.

Kindest regards,

Joanne. wub.gif

#12 Guest_Beth87_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 12:02 PM

You can get bottles of saline solution from opticians. It's used to wash and disinfect contact lenses (I assume that it's the same stuff!).

Beth x

#13 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 04:03 PM

Thanks for all your replies and suggestions. We will be getting him to a vet. Just got to find one now!

#14 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 04:14 PM

Well just phoned the vets down the road, and they have a reptile vet come in each week, so ive booked in next wendesday with him. We shall see what he says! Im not really overly concerned about the eye, im sure it will clear up. I just wouldnt mind advice on whether he should be hibernated and the once over really.

#15 Guest_cyberangel_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 04:45 PM

Any illness Mark, and I wouldnt hibernate this year. Especially so close to hibernation time. If it were earlier in the year then the tortoise would have at least some time to really recover.
Eye infections can be just that, or something has scratched the lens of the eye, but they also can be a sign of underlying infections/illness. So a really good idea to get your tort checked out.

#16 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 06:34 PM

Poor little chap! And this close to hibernation too. wub.gif
What bad luck.
Let us know how Onion gets on with the vet on Wednesday.
We shall all have our fingers crossed for him.

Paula x


#17 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 07:40 PM

Hi Mark,
I wish onion a speedy recovery. Please let us know how he gets on. Best of luck. wink.gif
Kind Regards
Freddy biggrin.gif

#18 Guest_markf_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 08:31 PM

thanks guys! I will keep you posted!

This year is the boys last year of being indoor tortoises. Apart from a run in the garden. Thier enclosure is now more or less finished. So from the spring they will be outside!!

I was just wondering how some of you are not hibernating yours already when your torts live outside?? Do you bring them in and then wind them down when your ready, or do you just keep some heat in thier home outside?

I know the way the temp suddenly drops in october then rises again then drops must cause some trouble. Mine are small enough to bring back in to a tort table , but i would rather things happen for them more naturally.

#19 Guest_Freddy McGavin_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 08:56 PM

Hi Mark,
I have a 50 year old adult tortoise so I may do things a little differently to others. My tortoise is kept outside in the garden during the year but I bring her indoors at night when temps are cooler. Around September as the weather becomes colder I find myself bringing her in earlier and earlier in the evenings. She stays indoors at night at room temperatures. I then put her back outside each morning to graze. Gradually at the end of September she starts to slow down outside and stops eating altogether. I then find myself keeping her more and more indoors. Finally around the middle of October she shuts down completely for hibernation. She will bury herself outside in the garden or she will remain inactive if indoors. I then prepare a box of topsoil and hibernate her in a cool,dry and quiet place were temps reach no less than 0 degrees or no more than 9 degrees using what's called the box method. However, I must stress that this is my own natural routine for hibernating my tortoise Billiejo and I have done it this way for almost 30 years. Things may be different for others and may also depend on the climate of your particular region of the U.K. Anyway Mark I hope you find some of this information helpful. Best of luck.
Kind Regards
Freddy

#20 Guest_Hettie_*

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 10:10 PM



Hi Mark,

My little guys are only whipper snappers so additional heat is required outside.

I have a really well insulated shed with a greenhouse attached to it, then attached to that is a small enclosed outside garden. As the cold weather sets in I firstly confine them to the shed and greenhouse and then later just to the shed unless of course we have a sunny day that will warm the greenhouse.
They are mainly in their shed right now. I have a combined bulb in there and some UV Strips to make it lighter (I just use some old ones with next to nothing UV levels) The little guys use the combined bulb so it is only to increase light levels. I also have tubular heaters set on a thermostat 14C night time, 21C daytime.
I shall reduce the amount of time the lights are on and increase the time the nightime temperature setting runs during winddown. Lowering the temperature slightly. Then they shall be popped into the fridge for their big sleep.. A cunning plan, sounds so simple... fingers crossed!

Paula x





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