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Norman And Hazel's Diet :)


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#41 Kelly

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 06:31 AM

Really you should ONLY be feeding supermarket bagged mixes as a last resort over the winter months if there is nothing alse available to you. Very occassionally I will offer a little as a treat. If you look at the ingredients list, look for salad mixes that contain:

Escarole
Radicchio
Tatsoi
Rocket
Endive
Lambs Lettuce
Red Chard
Mizuna
Coriander
Apollo Lettuce
Lollo Rosso
Lollo Verde
Baby Red Oak Lettuce
Baby Lollo Biondi
Tango Lettuce
Romaine

Avoid mixes containing root vegetables

I hardly EVER feed anything other than weeds, because they have all the vitamins and minerals that your tortoise needs as long as you are feeding a balanced diet. Plus they are free!!! Why go to the supermarket, when you can pick your own? ;)

#42 Lucy-lou123

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 09:18 PM

Thank. You Kelly and Karen. I'm off Monday so going to take my nephew on a weed hunt lol

#43 Kelly

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 02:30 PM

I found some loads of Cranesbill Geranium today. :)

 

MeadowCranesbillGeranium_zps6154b909.jpg



#44 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 06:41 PM

Lucy... A good trick is to supplement your crispy floret with weeds if you can't get enough on a weed walk.... And the interesting thing is that the weeds available change with the seasons.
I use the tortoise table site to identify suitable weeds ..... And introduce new ones slowly....
Don't forget some garden plants are tort friendly .... Get some in tubs and grow on for winter/ spring food x x x

#45 Kelly

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 03:46 PM

Finally..... common mallow. I've been on the hunt for this for AGES! ;)

 

CommonMallow_zps3b4efe9a.jpg

 

I uprooted it and planted it in the outdoor enclosure a few days ago.... along with loads of shepherds purse. :)



#46 Kelly

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:20 PM

I got myself rather over excited today because I found my first crop of Forget Me Nots. :D

 

ForgetMeNot_zps71ff52aa.jpg

 

I uprooted one plant to put in the outdoor enclosure, but will be going back for more over the weekend I think! There's LOADS of them so I may take a carrier bag!  ;)



#47 Graham

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:33 PM

You won't need to plant many, Kelly, forget-me-nots spread rapidly and self-seed too, so you'll soon have a garden-full of the them  :)



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Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:45 PM

I wish I had that knack Graham.... Fingers crossed my small clump has survived the winter and will seed nicely!! X x x hugs x x

#49 Kelly

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 05:06 PM

You won't need to plant many, Kelly, forget-me-nots spread rapidly and self-seed too, so you'll soon have a garden-full of the them  :)

 

In that case, I may plant them in a sparse part of the garden to add a bit of colour, that way I can replant some in the enclosure as and when I need to so they don't take over. I think they're really pretty, so they can take up as much of my garden as they like.  :)

 

Do they prefer a sunny or shady area? 



#50 Graham

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 05:49 PM

They will tolerate full sun, Kelly, but prefer, and grow better in semi-shade.

They grew so prolifically in my garden last year to the extent I had to uproot 90% of them. It was heart-breaking, but had to be done.  :sob:



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Posted 11 April 2014 - 06:24 PM

Ha ha ha!! Oh Graham, how the grass is always greener..... I was visiting my sister in law last summer and her neighbours garden was ALL forget me nots........ I couldn't keep my eyes off them!!!!! X x x hugs x x

#52 Graham

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 10:00 PM

As a PS to this, the spreading of forget-me-nots in the tortoise enclosure doesn't normally become a problem inasmuch that the tortoises will eat them, therefore controlling the proliferation. However, as Lord Muck himself (Harry) has become incredibly choosy in his extensive choice of diet, these particular plants grow uncontrollably, due to not being devoured.

If I took Harry to the Fat Duck he would say 'Oh, no, no, I don't do any old caviare, it HAS to be Beluga, darlink!'

Talk about spoiled!



#53 Kelly

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 01:21 PM

I've got another little lovely to add to the list that I found in my garden this week. Dog Violet.  :)

 

DogViolet_zpsa7895a30.jpg

 

There's load of it dotted about in my back garden.



#54 Becca

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 08:28 PM

Hi Kelly, you seem to really have a gift for identifying weeds!

 

This may sound like a really stupid question but what sort of areas do you go to to find them?  We have been to our local parks, riverside walks and woodland areas and even went off the beaten track so to speak but still haven't really found much.  There was one area where me and the kids thought we had done well but when we got back home and double checked what we had found we weren't brave enough to feed them to Derek as we weren't quite sure.  We have quite a supply of Dandelions and Clover in the garden but he doesn't seem to eat the clover therefore he isn't getting much variety at the moment. I am going to get some seeds to grow my own but would also like to try identifying some out in the wild - could you recommend any books? What would you think of something like this http://www.amazon.co...ds=wild flowers

 

Becca :)



#55 Kelly

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 08:53 PM

I've got my eyes to the ground whenever I go out with my dog! I look wherever I am and have found little gems virtually everywhere. Grass verges, parks, woodland, farmland, fields and meadows.

 

I have a couple of British wild flower books for an initial ID and then cross reference anything I find on the Tortoise Table website to check if it's edible. Good old Google is really good too for just typing in a description of what you find, then you can trawl through all the images to check that your ID is correct.



#56 Graham

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 07:39 AM

Hi, Becca,

Kelly is correct is what she says, and I'd like to add that identifying weeds and wild flowers is analogous to taking up bird-watching; you have no idea on the variety and just what is under your own nose when you take it up.

Once you begin to be able to identify a few plants, you'll be amazed at just what is around.

The Collins' Gem books are very good, but the one I really recommend (it got me started) is this one:

 

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/184451840X

 

PS. When buying books from Amazon, I always choose used rather than new; they are always in perfectly good condition, and cost a mere fraction of the new price.



#57 Kelly

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:03 AM

One of my books is a Collins one too, Graham.  ..... "Wild Flowers of Britain & Europe" :)

 

I found another new one to add to the list today..... Herb Robert (part of the Geranium family).

 

HerbRobert_zps87a7c39e.jpg

 

It's fine fed in moderation, however it will be interesting to see my two eat it because it's quite high in tannins, so they may not like the taste.






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