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Microchipping And Certificates


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#1 den2908

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 08:37 AM

Hi there,

I am a bit confused about how to get the microchip numbers on my Daphne and Mabel's certificates put into my name. The shop where I bought them gave me their certificates - but the holders name is the only name on them. In hindsight I really wish I'd got them from a breeder, and got better advice all round. Am thinking I perhaps need to ring the shop tomorrow. But it would help to understand the process before I do. Any ideas how I go about this?

On a lighter note - we have some sun here today! The girlies have been out since 8.00am enjoying the nice weather. Hurray!


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#2 Guest_Chrissyan_*

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 08:50 AM

Morning Denise, I am no expert, but from what I understand micro chipping is usually done when the tortoise reaches 100mm. You will need to send the CITES certificate off to Defra with the fee and get the ownership put in your name prior micro chipping.

#3 Kelly

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 08:56 AM

I've been reading into this myself recently and found this information helpful. x

Tortoise Law

Are you on the right side of it?

The following will give you a better understanding regarding the currant law on tortoise sales and keeping as pets.

All tortoise species are listed on CITES { Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora } and are sub-divided in to Annex's. Species listed in Annex B require no sales certificate {referred to as a License } to purchase or to sell. All species listed in Annex A require a sales certificate within the E.U.

There are two types of sales certificates, one is called a "Transaction Article 10 Certificate" and the other is called a "Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate".

Transaction Article 10 Certificates (UPDATED INFORMATION)

Are issued to specimens which are to small to be micro chipped {under 100 mm plastron length } and therefore cannot be identified as an individual. The certificate is only valid to the person named in box one and no other person has the legal right to use this certificate. It is illegal to sell Annex A species with a Transaction Article 10 certificate which has a different name and address in box one to the person selling it. If you pass the specimen to another person the certificate must be sent back to DEFRA and a photocopy given to the new keeper clearly marked "Copy for information only" .

If you are not intending to sell the specimen you may keep the certificate in the sellers name but will have to change it at a later date if you decide to sell it.

Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificates

Are only issued to specimens that have been micro chipped { over 100 mm plastron length }and therefore can be identified as an individual. These certificates can be passed on to new owners without changing the name and address in box one.

Beware of other E.U. Transaction Certificates

You can purchase tortoise's in the U.K. with certificates issued by another E.U. member state provided it's a Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate and the specimen has been micro chipped. However it is illegal to buy or sell a tortoise with a Transaction Certificate issued by another E.U. member state from an individual other than the person named in box one of the certificate. Many illegal traders in the U.K. are selling tortoises with German Transaction certificates which is illegal. The trader must apply to DEFRA to have these certificates re-issued to there own name before offering them for sale.

In Germany they have been issuing certificates with a photo of the tortoise on it claiming it is a form of identification and issuing a Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate . It has now been agreed at the last EC CITES Committee meeting that photo's will not be considered as a valid form of ID , therefore these certificates are transaction certificates and the seller must by law have them changed to there name before offering them for sale.

Before buying a tortoise check the certificates which are being used and make sure it is in the sellers name unless it is a Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate which will show the microchip number in box 4. If you suspect that a tortoise is be sold illegally with incorrect papers or no papers at all you should report them to DEFRA and help discourage the illegal trade in tortoise's.

You can contact DEFRA at;

General Enquiries Tel: 0117 372 8168 - Fax: 0117 372 8206 - E-mail: wildlife.enforce@defra.gsi.gov.uk

#4 Kelly

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:00 AM

From what I understand, you don't need to get the certificate put into your name if it has a microchip number on it because the animal can be identified as an individual. If they're under 100mm however, I think you only have to get the certificate put into your name if you plan to sell the animal on.

#5 den2908

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    Denise
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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:08 AM

Morning Chryssian and Kelly,

Thank you - loads of great information.

Looks like I have a specimen specific Article 10 for both as they already have the microchip numbers for each on them. However, my name is not on the certificate anywhere, so my worry is that if, (heaven forbid), I ever lost one, then how would it be re-united with us?

Perhaps a phone call to Defra?

Denise

#6 Kelly

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:09 AM

Here's a document listing the fees. I understand it's £59 to get an ownership certificate.

Attached Files



#7 den2908

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:12 AM

Sorry Kelly, I was typing my reply and didnt see your last comment until after I'd posted- doh! Does that mean then, that as long as I have the microchip numbers on the certs I hold then I can identify them as mine. I'd hate them to be sent back to the holder- the name in Box 1 because, tbh, am really rather fond of them now, (understatement- totally loved up!!) :wub: ha ha

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#8 den2908

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:13 AM

Kelly - you are a star! Thank you!

#9 Kelly

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:14 AM

My tortoise is microchipped and the certificate is not in my name, but I registered his microchip number on the PETtrac, which is part of AVID's global database. It costs £12 to register.

http://www.pettrac.co.uk/

#10 Kelly

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 04:25 PM

I have found this that put it all into simple terms. x

There are two types of sales certificate, one is called a ‘Transaction Article 10 Certificate’ and the other is called a ‘Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate’.
Transaction Article 10 Certificates are issued to specimens which are too small to be microchipped (under 100 mm plastron length) and therefore cannot be identified as an individual. The certificate is only valid to the person named and no other person has the legal right to use this certificate. Each time the specimen changes hands the certificate must be sent back to DEFRA to be re-issued to the person selling it! It is illegal to sell Annex A species with a Transaction Article 10 Certificate which has a different name and address to the person selling it. If you are not intending to sell the specimen you may keep the certificate in the seller’s name but will have to change it at a later date if you decide to sell it .

Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificates are only issued to specimens that have been microchipped (over 100 mm plastron length) and therefore can be identified as an individual. These certificates can be passed on to new owners without changing the name and address.
Beware of other E.U. Transaction Certificates

You can purchase tortoises in the U.K. with certificates issued by another E.U. member state, provided it is a Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate and the specimen has been microchipped. However, it is illegal to buy or sell a tortoise with a Transaction Certificate issued by another E.U. member state from an individual other than the person named in the certificate. Many illegal traders in the U.K. are selling tortoises with German Transaction certificates which is illegal. The trader must apply to DEFRA to have these certificates re-issued in their own name before offering them for sale .
In Germany they have been issuing certificates with a photo of the tortoise on it claiming it is a form of identification and issuing a Specimen Specific Article 10 Certificate. It has now been agreed at the last EC CITES Committee meeting that photos will not be considered as a valid form of ID, therefore these certificates are transaction certificates and the seller must by law have them changed to their name before offering them for sale.

#11 deezzee

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 08:12 PM

Hi all

 

Desperate for some info on chipping and certs.

 

I recently adopted 2 Hermanns a male 5 years and a female 7 years.  They were given to me by a lovely lady who told me she had bred them herself but her circumstances had changed and could no longer keep them.  they are not chipped and i wasn't given any certificates for them.

 

My question is this, can i keep them as is or do i need to get them certified and chipped?

 

I am so confused about this as the cert site doesn't have this senario.

 

Any info would be very much appreciated.

 

thank you



#12 wizzasmum

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:14 AM

Hi all
 
Desperate for some info on chipping and certs.
 
I recently adopted 2 Hermanns a male 5 years and a female 7 years.  They were given to me by a lovely lady who told me she had bred them herself but her circumstances had changed and could no longer keep them.  they are not chipped and i wasn't given any certificates for them.
 
My question is this, can i keep them as is or do i need to get them certified and chipped?
 
I am so confused about this as the cert site doesn't have this senario.
 
Any info would be very much appreciated.
 
thank you



Hi Deezee. You can keep them as they are so long as no money changed hands. If it did, then the seller committed an offence. Your problem would be if they bred, when you would need certificates for the babies in order to sell them. Your adults would then have to be chipped and registered too, which is not easy as they came from unregistered parents. A letter of gifting from the original owner would help. Hopefully you would obtain a couple more females before then to spread the balance. One of each is never a good idea. Hope this helps.




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