Jump to content


Photo

Does Your Tortoise Hate Baths?



  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Graham

Graham

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, GB
  • Interests:Looking after my Harry, of course, birdwatching, writing articles for my professional journal, Taekwon-Do, going to the ballet, eating out, holidaying in Scotland with my wife.

Posted 23 September 2012 - 05:13 PM

Hi,
I don't know if anyone else has had this problem, but Harry made it quite clear from the beginning that he hates being bathed. He was obviously frightened and stressed, frantically clambering to get out. Although he bathes and drinks from his own pool in the garden very often, this worried me because I realise the importance of bathing during the wind-down period and re-emergence from hibernation.
However, I think I found the solution:
I now put him in the bath, and shower him with warm water. He obviously thinks it's raining, for he shows no fear or stress at all, very happily sits there with his limbs and head out, and soaks and drinks. I put the plug in, let the water reach and inch or so, then let it out at intervals to keep the water level constant.
I'm so glad I discovered this, and I do hope it will be of some help to anyone else who has the same problem.

Here he is:

Attached File  HarryShower.jpg   3.03KB   20 downloads

#2 Guest_Stella_*

Guest_Stella_*
  • Guests

Posted 23 September 2012 - 05:30 PM

It could be a boy thing!!!! Boy Pebble stands on his claws in the water go ages.... Rocking about as he is clearly unbalanced (not mentally you understand :-)))... If he doesn't nose dive into the water, he will slowly slide his legs out sideways and just lay there. I have found with all my torts they only begin to try and get out of their bath once they have had a wee and poo!!!! X x x hugs x x

#3 Kelly

Kelly

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 961 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leicestershire
  • Interests:Walking, circuit training, reading, volunteering with The Leicester and Rutland Wildlife Trust and looking after my menagerie of 3 cats, a leopard gecko, a 23 year old corn snake, Maddie the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, my 5 year old Hermann tortoise, Norman and my 2 year old, Hazel. :)

Posted 23 September 2012 - 06:32 PM

Norman loves his daily bath every morning after he wakes up.... he happily wallows for at least 20 minutes before scrabbling to get out.

Posted Image Posted Image

#4 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 23 September 2012 - 07:22 PM

Hi,
I don't know if anyone else has had this problem, but Harry made it quite clear from the beginning that he hates being bathed. He was obviously frightened and stressed, frantically clambering to get out. Although he bathes and drinks from his own pool in the garden very often, this worried me because I realise the importance of bathing during the wind-down period and re-emergence from hibernation.
However, I think I found the solution:
I now put him in the bath, and shower him with warm water. He obviously thinks it's raining, for he shows no fear or stress at all, very happily sits there with his limbs and head out, and soaks and drinks. I put the plug in, let the water reach and inch or so, then let it out at intervals to keep the water level constant.
I'm so glad I discovered this, and I do hope it will be of some help to anyone else who has the same problem.

Here he is:

Posted Image


Kept outdoors, they do not need bathing, so long as they have access to water if they need it. Outdoor humidity is naturally high at ground level - no-one bathes them in the wild, sometimes requiring them to go for months without water ;)

#5 Graham

Graham

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, GB
  • Interests:Looking after my Harry, of course, birdwatching, writing articles for my professional journal, Taekwon-Do, going to the ballet, eating out, holidaying in Scotland with my wife.

Posted 23 September 2012 - 07:33 PM

I was under the impression that bathing tortoises after hibernation was important in order to re-hydrate them, and to encourage drinking.
Maybe I was wrong :(

#6 MeImNot

MeImNot

    Tortoise Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Interests:Chelonia in general
    \m/

Posted 23 September 2012 - 08:29 PM

Mine doesn't like it either...seems that she hates confined spaces more than the actual water. I bath her first thing in the morning when she's still completely dazed but as soon as she picks up whats happening she's clawing to get out...but she's happy going through her water dish and wallow a bit by herself!!

#7 Freddy

Freddy

    Advanced Tortoise Member

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:County Cavan, Ireland
  • Interests:Journalism, Amateur Radio, Astronomy, History, Literature, Music, Photography, Gardening, Conservation, Birdwatching, Tortoises.

Posted 23 September 2012 - 08:57 PM

I was under the impression that bathing tortoises after hibernation was important in order to re-hydrate them, and to encourage drinking.
Maybe I was wrong :(


Hi Graham,
I always give my adult tortoise a luke -warm bath after hibernation. As you say this helps re-hydrate her and encourages drinking. It also helps flush out any toxins she may have built up in her body over hibernation. Moreover, I can bath her eyes, mouth and generally clean her up before drying her off.
For the rest of the time I just provide her with a dish of water and no baths. As Sue says outdoor humidity is naturally high at ground level.
We also get frequent rain showers here in Ireland which helps too.
Hope this helps. Take care.
Kind Regards
Freddy

#8 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

Guest_Wizzasmum_*
  • Guests

Posted 24 September 2012 - 01:44 PM

I was under the impression that bathing tortoises after hibernation was important in order to re-hydrate them, and to encourage drinking.
Maybe I was wrong :(


Yes, it's important for water to be available to them after hibernation, so that they can replenish old stores, but I did mention that water should be available ;) If hibernated in humid conditions, they do not lose water in the smae way as if hibernated in dry conditions. In wild conditions, they rarely lose weight/water over the hibernation period.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords:

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users