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#21 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 10:19 AM

...... and I wonder how much of what we feed here in the UK is actually found in their native environment?. :hmm:



This is one of the few dried tortoise foods that the Tortoise Trust advocates due to it's high fibre content. They state that it helps with problems like diarrhoea and constipation and recommend it during the winter months as part of their diet if overwintering. ;)

As Andy Highfield states:
"While it is the case that on the surface pelleted foods may appear to be an attractive means of providing dried vegetation to captive tortoises, most - as noted - fail in a number of critical respects. The development of pelleted foods that include a high proportion of very long fibres, coarse, large particles and an appropriate protein and trace-element content should not be impossible, however. Some commercial manufacturers have already moved in that direction (Pro-Alpinand Pre-Alpin Testudo). These products are unusual in that they include a much broader diversity of plant species than typical mass-produced pellet feeds, and they omit the potentially very damaging grain and maize-based derivatives included in most other commercial offerings. They also have crude fibre and protein levels that more closely approximate that of the typical wild diet."

You can read the full research findings here: http://www.tortoiset...etaryfibre.html


Hi Kelly
As I have done a fair bit of research into what tortoises eat in the wild and discovered that a hell of a lot of it is the same as what we find here, I've happy giving the diet the Tlady chooses. She did most of her research with TT lol, which a lot of people don't seem to realise - if you can show me a point where AH actually disagrees with her texts, I will eat my hat lol I'm not going to quote anything that AH says re tortoises as most of us know he has changed his mind several times over the years on various things and seems to have a penchant for threats to sue etc etc - I have a pic of them here with various different species on a lawn together which I fee does not bode well and various others that we will not go into ;) I was poo pooed a few years back by AH for stating that my hatchlings were doing so much better since having talks with a German lady about humid hides, I think the reply was made in capitals in places stating - NO EVIDENCE (despite me having my own evidence) - now I hear that he has started to make statements about similar hides to the contrary and it will be only a matter of time before it's all the TT's idea. Don't get me wrong, I supported the TT sicne the early 80's in my naievety, thinking they were a chartiy( whereas in fact they were a business all along) and I did obtain some useful information, but they are not the be all and end all, and certainly have a few unanswered questions there ;) To my mind and many others they have let their followers down in a pretty big way over recent years, not being too worried about what damage was caused on the way but hey, what do I know.
Yes, the additions of various addiditives to many dried foods is a cause for concern but not using them, I would not know how it impacts on the long term care of chelonia. All I have said is that it is unlikely that there is ever any need to use dry food if you only have a couple of tortoises. Not so long ago, the TT were saying just the same ;)
I have a list with photos somewhere deep in my own archives of plants which we discovered wild tortoises eating in the fields of south western Turkey, both in mountainous and lowland areas. It's on a disc somewhere but I'm sure I could dig it out when a spare minute comes my way :)

#22 Kelly

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 01:49 PM

That's be brilliant Sue. I'm always up for learning more. :) My friends are calling me a nerd now, because I spend so much of my time either studing for my degree or doing tortoise research! :rofl:

#23 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:15 PM

You can't do too much torty research. If you can get a chance to give up your hols to watch them in the wild, it can be done fairly cheaply so long as you know where to go. If you are really serious about it and don't mind spening a lot of time on hands and knees with people laughing at you, it's the best way to learn. Take a reliable thermometer, not one with glass dial and a good cream for your knees lol and you will learn more than from any book you can find. I recommend it - also I think it should be part of every exotics vets training - we would see much better care of our tortoises that way ;)

#24 Kelly

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:28 PM

I'm used to people laughing at me!! I get it on a fairly regular basis. :rofl:

I was actually discussing this very thing with my partner a few weeks ago, but he didn't look too keen! Where abouts have you been?

#25 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 09:25 PM

Well, I have to say Galapagos was by far my better experience, although not directly relating to my own torts. We stayed at Steve Devines house on Devine Bay, you just wouldn't want to ever come home lol http://www.gianttort.../who_we_are.php I was just so lucky to have a good friend who knows him and his wife Jenny.
Much more realistically though and much better from our own torts point of view, you would do a lot worse than visiting Adrasan in Southern Turkey. This is a place I could go back to time and time again. Again, lucky to have a friend who lived there but have also stayed at the Ford Hotel there, which is perfect tortoise watching terrain. The hotel is situated at the end of a long sandy beach, well away from any main roads (you do need a car) and within a few minutes of some brilliant tortoise watching areas. You must never pick up the tortoises but in actual fact you learn far more from just watching anyway. If people do pick them up, their instinct is to urinate, which means it could be a long long time before that water is replenished, so contributing to possible dehydration. Anyway waffling now - this is the place to go in my own humble opinion http://www.cavus-bay.com/

#26 Freddy

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 09:39 PM

Sounds like you've had quite a few tortoise adventures ,Sue. :) I have never been to any of the natural habitats. Would love to visit the Galapagos Islands one day and see the Giant tortoises. ;)
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Freddy :D

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 10:40 PM

Sounds like you've had quite a few tortoise adventures ,Sue. :) I have never been to any of the natural habitats. Would love to visit the Galapagos Islands one day and see the Giant tortoises. ;)
Kind Regards
Freddy :D


I have a funny feeling Galapagos may become unreachable to anyone but locals soon Freddie - could be wrong though. It was a strange feelling, it was as though you should not really be there, but such a privilege. I had told my friend that I would always want to go with her if she went again - suddenly it was real and I had to sell my beloved car to fund the trip - well worth it though, and to stay at Steve's place for almost a month was just unreal. The Ford hotel in Turkey was another accident as it was cheaper to book a last minute holiday than find the airfair to visit a friend at Olympus. We were not going to stay there until we saw how beautiful it was and I can thoroughly recommend it despite it's rather dodgy name. I shall definitely go there again if I can get a house sitter for my tribe :)

#28 Claireybelle

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 09:28 AM

My friend has just come back from Atlanya, Turkey and took a photo of a hatchling on the beach, must of only been around a month old as was similar size to my baby. Sounds very interesting though

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 12:40 PM

That could well have been put there by a tourist Clairey. They don't usually frequent beach areas, but stay well back under vegetation. Unfortunately, a fair few perish by reaching the salty beaches. It's quite common for locals to try to sell hatchlings to gullible tourists too and some have been found escaped in hotels and other unlikely places :(

#30 Guest_Chrissyan_*

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 06:34 PM

The beaches around Atlanya are well know for their Loggerhead Turles, perhaps it was a turtle on the beach :)




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