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Worm Count


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#1 Kelly

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 06:41 PM

Got Norman and Hazel's worm count results back..... and they both got the all clear for the second year running. :yay:

 

Attached File  Norman's Results.JPG   23.25KB   2 downloads

Attached File  Hazel's Results.JPG   18.46KB   0 downloads

 

  :)



#2 Beermat89

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:41 PM

Great news kelly :)

#3 mildredsmam

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 03:49 AM

that's good news Kelly. :)



#4 Kelly

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:09 AM

I've never changed the substrate outside, but it does have a strong wire mess over the top to keep out cats and foxes. Other than that I don't really do any thing different.... Must just be lucky so far I guess. :)



#5 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 04:56 PM

Yes you must be getting something very right there Kelly. Mine always seem to get re-infected, probably from the ground in the enclosure. I can't move all that substrate every year!!

I never change outdoor soil as the weather cleans it naturally ;)  Changing it is more likely to bring new infections, that torts are not resistant to in my experience.



#6 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 04:59 PM

I've never changed the substrate outside, but it does have a strong wire mess over the top to keep out cats and foxes. Other than that I don't really do any thing different.... Must just be lucky so far I guess. :)

Not at all Kelly. If it's large enough and gets rained on, snowed on and has hot periods in summer, it will look after itself, unless your torts are already infected. I have always wormed my torts annually in line with recommendation by TT and the Royal Veterinary College. This year, I sent off faecal samples late in the year with no treatment and my torts are clear too :)  I will probably reduce to biannual worming and test again in a few years, just to see how things go for myself.



#7 Kelly

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:02 PM

I never change outdoor soil as the weather cleans it naturally ;)  Changing it is more likely to bring new infections, that torts are not resistant to in my experience.

 

Definitely...... they don't have a change of substrate in the wild!   ;)

 

I've never wormed my torts as they have always been clear...... should I be doing an annual worming.... or just carry on as I have.... and test them annually at the end of the season, then treat if needed?



#8 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:08 PM

The difference with wild torts though is that they do carry worms, they just leave them in more far flung places, where they are often ingested by birds and other animals. It's very unlikely that a tort is completely clear as all mammals carry parasites, even humans, but a low count could possible stay low for some time given enough space. I will be checking mine again next year and if there is a rise, even a small one, will worm again, as obviously the more worms, the more contamination on the ground. Horses etc are usually moved to a different field for a time each year to prevent the ground becoming what is known as horse sick, which means the same as too many parasites ;)



#9 Kelly

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 02:25 PM

What I do is to treat for worms if there is a problem rather than routinely. .  

 

I think this is the route I'm going to go down..... I'd rather not worm them if it's not necessary.






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