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Hollyhocks


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#1 Graham

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:09 PM

The hollyhocks I grew from seed are flowering really nicely this year......................

 

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...................much to Harry's delight!

 

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#2 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:20 PM

Wow Graham, they look great. I haven't ever been able to grow anything from seed..... We sent away for Countryfile wild flower mix and nothing has happened yet. Are you going to let some self seed for the future. My bought in hollyhock plants are looking good and I am tempted to let the last flowers seed to see what happens next year. X x x hug x x x

#3 Graham

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 07:21 PM

Hi, Stella; no, I won't be letting them go to seed, I much prefer to control my plant growth. You can, indeed, let them self-seed if you like, but the chances are that you won't get much in the way of results; hollyhocks are absolute slug and snail bait, so they'll probably be eaten before you even see them. Best bet is to harvest the seeds, keep them in a cool, dark place, and plant them in pots come next spring. You need to keep a few going each year as hollyhocks only last a couple of years, and are very prone to dying in the winter after a year or so. 

When your plants die back in the autumn, cut them right down to ground level, and cover with gravel or soot; this will protect them over the winter, and they will regenerate next spring. This will extend they lives by at least year or more.



#4 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 07:37 PM

Hey, great tip!! Yes I have noticed the snails and slugs have a field day if given a chance.......hence the early morning flying lessons many have...... They are bi annuals I think so it takes a couple of years to get the flowers.... Maybe when I retire and have time on my hands!!!!
X x x x hugs x x x

#5 Graham

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 08:06 PM

Same here, Stella, the slugs and snails are getting used to high-speed jettison-ing to next door, lol!

The common varieties of hollyhocks are classed as biennial, but, looked after properly, can well exceed this. Also, the dark and black varieties such as nigris and blackberry are defined as perennial, so will last for years. They take an extra year to mature and flower, but are much less susceptible to mollusc attack, and the black flowers are a joy to behold. (Most importantly, torts love them!).



#6 Guest_Wizzasmum_*

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 09:00 PM

Looking good Graham. Well done :)



#7 mildredsmam

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 02:01 PM

They look great Graham, well done. :)



#8 Freddy

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 03:24 PM

The hollyhocks look really nice, Graham. :) Best of luck with the plant growing. ;)

Kind  Regards

Freddy :D






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