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Body Mass Condition, What's It All About?


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#1 TortoiseJay

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 06:15 PM

Hi there my tort is going into hibernation soon (yes it's late) and I just did the calcs on the link provided in the hibernation section on the top thread that is pinned.

My torts results came back as - 0.03 is this bad or good how can it improve etc can anyone explain how it works and if my tort is healthy etc just want to be 100%

Is it even essential to know?

Thanks again!

#2 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 10:55 PM

Is your tortoise wild caught with the exact same growth as a wild one? If not then it's not easy to learn its body mass as she'll structure can be different as in less dense, therefore throwing calculations way out. Ratios are rarely correct, based on this fact. A photo will help to tell how your tortoise has grown but it will still be guess work really. If he feels like a solid rock, rather than a shell, this is a good indication to good body weight. The Jackson ratio was calculTed for yes based on wild tortoises if this is the one you are using.
Hope this helps.

#3 TortoiseJay

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:19 PM

Is your tortoise wild caught with the exact same growth as a wild one? If not then it's not easy to learn its body mass as she'll structure can be different as in less dense, therefore throwing calculations way out. Ratios are rarely correct, based on this fact. A photo will help to tell how your tortoise has grown but it will still be guess work really. If he feels like a solid rock, rather than a shell, this is a good indication to good body weight. The Jackson ratio was calculTed for yes based on wild tortoises if this is the one you are using.
Hope this helps.


I was using the jacksons ratio and this: http://www.ahailey.f9.co.uk/cond.htm

Thanks Sue

#4 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:48 PM

I have several tortoises, many of which were wild caught adults, before I rehomed them. Most of these fall within the guide of the Jackson ratio, but two of my females don't as one is much longer and slimmer in shape than usual and the other is shorter but much wider, so one always comes up as underweight and the other obese, even though both are perfectly healthy. I have several rehomers bred in this country, neither of which fall within the norm of either ratio. This is because the shell formation is not the same as a wild shell due to over fast growth. The shell of such torts is more porous on cross section and although thicker than usual is actually lighter, so gives a false reading, even though body mass is actually fine. Hope this makes sense and shows how the accepted ratios can give a false reading. So if your torts are old imports to the country, the ratios might be useful, but if bred in this country and grown faster than wild tortoises, then the likelihood of them giving a good reading is not so likely.
Hope this helps ;)

#5 TortoiseJay

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 07:27 PM

Brilliant il try not to take much notice etc! If your advice keeps coming my way I'm going have have to get you a Christmas pressie to say thanks haha! ;)

#6 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 07:31 PM

Haha, I'd not worry too much. I tend to use the 'feels like a rock ' method mainly, but it's hard when you've nothing to compare them with.




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