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#21 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 01:42 PM

Sorry but that is total rubbish and probably an old edition. Had this argument many times with 'the powers that be' and was told repeatedly there was nothing to support the theory of humidity and smooth shells. I did say something along the lines of 'watch this space' and lo and behold the TT are now stating that humidity below ground contributes to smooth shell growth. You have to laugh sometimes. I'm not saying TT don't give good advice, they do, but we are all always learning and if you look at some of their old pics, mixing species, keeping on sand etc etc, it all falls into place ;) I've had my torts for over thirty years and given them the choice outdoors, where they frequently choose to sleep in damp soil as opposed to nice dry hides. Lawns are not a good idea in this country as a feeding area as the lush grass means that it rarely dries out completely, so this might just not be good for plastrons, but respiratory probs and shell rot, not seen it once in my group ;)

#22 Tilly_tortoise_123

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 02:25 PM

ok thanks anyways

#23 crotchetybear

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 02:59 PM

Hi,

 

I probably have the same book. The Tortoise Trust is a good source of information but it is not the only one and remember that advice changes as things move on. There are many good sources of advice available to you, including this forum, and I'm guessing you will already have looked at the sections on housing. 

 

Remember (and TT advice will support this) you are trying to create an environment that is as close as possible to what your tortoise would have in the wild. So you don't want a wet substrate, but one that is dry on the top and damp underneath so the tortoise can bury itself and regulate its temperature and humidity if it chooses to. Think about the summertime, when - ideally - tortoises should be outdoors in a secure enclosure. Unless there is a long hot and dry spell like last year, this is what the ground will be like naturally.

 

The soil in my indoor enclosure is 2.5 inches deep and - when the tortoises are in it - I water it round the edges using an ordinary water bottle with a rose attachment on it - I find this easier to handle indoors than a watering can which tends to soak the surrounding furniture if I'm not careful! (You can water the tortoise as well - mine quite enjoy a shower and it helps maintain hydration.)

 

If you are able to provide your tortoise with microclimates approaching what it would have in nature you will have hours of fun watching it demonstrate natural tortoise behaviour.

 

Chris



#24 pompeypoole

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 03:46 PM

I also keep my hatchlings this way. They often respond by soaking themselves in the water bow. They seem to love a good soak and drink at the same time.
I to have read a few books including TT. A book I would recommend is Naturalistic Keeping and Breeding of Hermanns Tortoises by Wolfgang Wegehaupt. It has been translated from German into English. I have read this book from page to page several times. Its is expensive but I feel worth every penny.

#25 TortoiseJay

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 03:58 PM

I also keep my hatchlings this way. They often respond by soaking themselves in the water bow. They seem to love a good soak and drink at the same time.
I to have read a few books including TT. A book I would recommend is Naturalistic Keeping and Breeding of Hermanns Tortoises by Wolfgang Wegehaupt. It has been translated from German into English. I have read this book from page to page several times. Its is expensive but I feel worth every penny.


Amen it's the best book by far!

#26 mildredsmam

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 04:32 PM

I have a tortoise trust book and this states that the Mediterranean tortoise substrate should remain dry as wet soil could cause skin, shell and respiratory disease.

Hi Tilly, I read the same thing years ago, every thing I read said to keep horsfields on dry substrate, after talking with Sue I changed the dry substrate and started to water it on a regular basis, I've been doing this for quite a few years now and can say I've seen a big improvement in how my babies grow etc, and never had any problems doing this.  :)



#27 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 06:17 PM

[quote name="pompeypoole" post="62300" timestamp="1420040789"]I also keep my hatchlings this way. They often respond by soaking themselves in the water bow. They seem to love a good soak and drink at the same time.
I to have read a few books including TT. A book I would recommend is Naturalistic Keeping and Breeding of Hermanns Tortoises by Wolfgang Wegehaupt. It has been translated from German into English. I have read this book from page to page several times. Its is expensive but I feel worth every penny.[/quotes



I also have this book, it's one of the better common sense approaches. Another lady with brilliant ideas, who I have swapped numerous emails with in the past, is Editha Kruger. She is also from Germany and did lots of experiments many years back re humidity and she'll growth. One of the most common sense things she likened young tortoises to, was harvested carrots. She showed how, if you left a carrot on the shelf or on top of the substrate, it would shrivel, but if it was left below the surface, even on dryish substrate, it would look exactly the same several weeks later, showing how moisture can be preserved by burying.

#28 LauraClaira

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 03:03 PM

Happy New Year : )
Hello from Toronto ! After much research we've just added a baby Hermann to our family - brought him/her home yesterday ... I've found this site & forums very helpful - I learned a lot from reading through previous posts... Now that we're all set up I thought I might 'submit' our table for everyone's impressions - feedback would be much appreciated : )
This is little Watson & his/her new home !

Attached File  image.jpg   99.47KB   0 downloadsAttached File  image.jpg   46.57KB   0 downloads

#29 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 06:27 PM

Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your new baby. My only criticism, would be to throw out the prepared food. As you can see he is choosing this over the natural food and his weight could well doublein a month or so on this diet, whereas a couple of grams a month is ample at this size. It's also addictive so if he continues with this it will be hard to get him onto a natural diet. Hope this helps ;)




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