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Weed Book


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#1 Guest_Dolly_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:15 PM

Hi

Can anyone recommend a good weed guide please?

Samantha

#2 Guest_Dolly_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:15 PM

I meant a book

#3 Graham

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:37 PM

This is the one I recommend, Dolly, it's the one I started with, and still refer to it now very often:

 

http://www.amazon.co...d flowers forey

 

When buying books from Amazon, go for used rather than new; they're a fraction of the price, and always in perfectly good condition.



#4 JerryMaffz

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:57 PM

You can download one for free here....http://www.thetortoi...let_8595_40.asp

You could make a small donation to the site for the download if you want. :)



#5 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 04:26 PM

Samantha, I think you will find the link to the Tortoisetable Plant Base very useful. I use it all the time, particularly when off to the garden centre!!! Also, if you are rubbish growing seeds, which sadly I am, try Naurescape......they can provide the more unusual weeds in plant form. I bought in some blue sow thistle last year. The torts loved it. And as a bonus it spreads like mad with runners.....so beware, it would eventually get everywhere x x x hugs x x x

#6 JerryMaffz

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 04:51 PM

I'm guessing you meant Naturescape Stella?..What a great site, I hadn't seen that one myself. Could come in very handy for Jerry's new enclosure come the Spring.

 

Keith



#7 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 06:10 PM

Yes Keith you are right!! If you get chance ti visit the place it is well worth a run out. A lovely tea room and seats by a huge pond x x x hugs x x

#8 Guest_Dolly_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 07:37 PM

Hi

Thank you so much for the links!! I shall get ordering now.

I have asked dad if the gardener can dig me a little plot so I can grow weeds . You should have seen his face he said " we spend all year killing weeds an now you want to grow some!?!?!?" Hahaha

Samantha x

#9 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 07:50 PM

My gardener is well used to not digging out weeds!!! X x x hugs x x x

#10 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 08:05 PM

Samantha, I think you will find the link to the Tortoisetable Plant Base very useful. I use it all the time, particularly when off to the garden centre!!! Also, if you are rubbish growing seeds, which sadly I am, try Naurescape......they can provide the more unusual weeds in plant form. I bought in some blue sow thistle last year. The torts loved it. And as a bonus it spreads like mad with runners.....so beware, it would eventually get everywhere x x x hugs x x x


That's not strictly speaking sowthistle Stella. It's a totally different species. Sowthistle is Sonchus ;)

#11 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 08:44 PM

Blue Sowthistle (Common Blue Sowthistle, Alpine Blue-sow-thistle)

Common name : Blue Sowthistle (Common Blue Sowthistle, Alpine Blue-sow-thistle)
Latin name : Cicerbita, esp. C. macrophylla, C. alpina, C. plumieri
Family name : Asteraceae/Compositae
Safe to feed but as it is a protected plant you must not pick it if you find it growing in the wild.

This is the entry Sue, so I guess if Tortoisetable calls it sowthistle that is good enough for me. And the tortoises live if, so that is even better x x x hugs x x

#12 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 08:51 PM

Was just pointing out that native sow thistles are Sonchus Stella. Cicerbitas are from the Aster family and an imported species from Russia I think. Do the tortoise table think it is ok to feed. I can't find their details. Are you sure it's protected? I always thought imported plants had to be controlled from spreading in the wild. I'm confused now. Need to do some searches lol

#13 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:00 PM

Blue Sowthistle (Common Blue Sowthistle, Alpine Blue-sow-thistle)


Common name : Blue Sowthistle (Common Blue Sowthistle, Alpine Blue-sow-thistle)
Latin name : Cicerbita, esp. C. macrophylla, C. alpina, C. plumieri
Family name : Asteraceae/Compositae

This tall (it can grow up to 2 m) perennial is said to have escaped from gardens in the UK in the 19th century and can now be found growing wild in small pockets around the country. Although it is related to the more common *Sow Thistle*, it is in a different genus, and its flower is often confused with that of another relation, the * Wild Chicory*.

It is perfectly safe to feed to tortoises, but if you find it growing in the wild, do not pick it as it is still relatively rare in the UK (and almost unknown in the far south) and is an officially protected plant.

This is what it says........... X x x x hugs x x

#14 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:05 PM

Never know who to believe do you.
This is from a list of imported plants


Home
Cicerbita macrophylla
Authors: Jane Squirrell
Last Updated: August 8th, 2011
GB Status

Blue sow-thistle is a garden escape that has naturalised throughout GB and has the potential to become invasive.

Short Description

A tall, rhizomatous, perennial member of the daisy family with pale mauve flowers. The upper parts of the stems are covered in glandular hairs, while the unbeaked achene has a pappus of unbranched hairs.

Impacts

Has the potential to produce large, dense, clonal patches that could out compete the native flora and reduce biodiversity at given sites.

Habitat

In its native distribution a species of mountain ranges. In its introduced range a species associated with disturbed, often man-made habitats.

Invasion History

Origin

The subspecies recorded in GB (ssp. uralansis) is native to The Urals, Russia.

First Record

Introduced to GB in 1823 and first recorded wild in Cumberland in 1915.

Pathway and Method

Introduced as an ornamental garden plant. It has subsequently escaped cultivation by inappropriate dumping of garden waste and by natural seed dispersal.

Species Status

Has become naturalised in northern Europe from Switzerland to Scandinavia. It is not however noted as being invasive although its potential to become invasive has been realised. It is especially widespread in GB where it has shown a moderate increase in its range and abundance over the last 20 years and is still considered to be spreading.

Ecology & Habitat

Dispersal Mechanisms

This species spreads locally via a rhizome system. Long distance dispersal is achieved via seed. The seeds are light with a pappus of hairs making them easily dispersed by wind currents. This species can also be distributed by man via inappropriate dumping of garden waste.

Reproduction

Flowers are insect pollinated. Vegetative reproduction occurs via its rhizome system.


Habitat Occupied in GB

Mainly found in artificial habitats such as rough and waste ground and roadsides.

Distribution

Frequent throughout most of GB.

Management

Prevention

Propose banning sales of this species to prevent its further distribution.

Mechanical

Legislation

References

#15 Guest_Stella_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:09 PM

Do you know Sue, I really am not too bothered x x

#16 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:11 PM

Meant to say there is a nature reserve not far from here and the members of the conservation group who manage it have to be aware of foreign species and to preserve the ecological balance of the meadows and therefore protect our native species of plants and wildlife. We have volunteers who help out with identifying various rogue plants and help eradicate them. We are very proud of our skylark hill, where, due to good management, we have an increased population of breeding skylarks. There are also some rare native plants that we have to protect by removing none native plants and weeds. Seems the Cicerbitas are becoming invasive in places, so was surprised to see other places say they are rare and protected.

#17 Guest_Dolly_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 10:19 PM



Hi

You know the one o click part of the dandilion cycle?..can tortoises eat that part too?

The seed part I think it is

Samantha

#18 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 10:43 PM

They can eat the whole plant above ground, but make sure its part of a varied diet, because although dandelions have a brilliant calcium to phosphorous ratio, they are also diuretic, so will make him wee more, which can lead to becoming dehydrated as you know ;)

#19 Guest_SueBoyle (was wizzasmum)_*

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 10:47 PM

Do you know Sue, I really am not too bothered x x


Oh, I'm sorry, I just find it all fascinating and always double check these things. Your plant reminded me of my conservation interest. It's a big part of my life and I did not realise it would offend :(

#20 Guest_Dolly_*

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 09:54 AM

Thank you SueBoyle x I don't think you could offend anyone. I like reading your posts because you are helpful and you are never condescending .

Samantha x




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