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Slow Worm Pics


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#1 pompeypoole

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 07:34 PM

On Sunday I decided to move one of my compost bins. Thought better of it when I lifted it up to find a couple of slow worms hidding out. These are becoming rare so we need to keep these types of environments for them.

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#2 wizzasmum

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 10:24 PM

Wow, not seen one of those for a long time. The only thing I found in mine was a rats skull lol.

#3 Rue

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 02:40 PM

I've never seen one at all I don't think!  Native to England?



#4 wizzasmum

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 04:15 PM

Yes, they like to lie under stuff or inhabit compost bins or dry stone walls etc They are actually legless lizards.

#5 Rue

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 04:44 PM

Yes.  I've seen legless lizards...somewhere.  Zoo?  But certainly not locally!

 

Very cool! :)



#6 pompeypoole

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 06:49 PM

I think this is an adult female. Males tend to slightly darker. They give birth to live young at the end of summer. I have seen the odd baby but they a tinny and fast. Hard to capture on camera. They are attracted to heat. So a compost heap is ideal.

#7 Graham

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 08:42 PM

We lived just on the edge of the Forest of Dean when I was a boy, so we regularly went searching for wildlife (no internet or social media in those days). We often found slow-worms and adders along with the occasional grass snake. I remember the day I picked a grass snake up and it gave me a wicked bite; not poisonous, I know, but a very painful infliction! I never picked another one up again.
The other interesting animal I saw was a beautiful pure-white fallow deer, obviously an albino; never seen or heard of one since.




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